Video: How to Ride at Night

How to Stay Visible while Riding in Low Light

As cyclists, we strive to make our presence known on the road. This concept is especially important when riding in low light conditions. Whether it’s early in the day or late at night, staying visible on the road should be your number one concern. We’ve put together some tips for staying visible in low light conditions. Enjoy!

City Cycling Tips: How to Ride at Night

See and Be Seen

The most important tip for safely riding in low light conditions is seeing and being seen on the road. There are many ways you can make yourself stand out on the road, such as using bright lights, reflectors, and more. If the driver can clearly see you, there is less chance for a crash.

Get Equipped with the Correct Gear

Pennsylvania state law requires cyclists to have a front headlight, rear reflectors, and side reflectors, like the ones on your pedals. We strongly encourage additional lighting, like a rear red light, to increase visibility. Also, wearing reflective clothing is a great way to see and be seen in the dark.

“All states require a bicycle to have a headlight at night. Pennsylvania also requires a rear reflector visible from 500 feet.”

Pennsylvania Bicycle Driver’s Manual – Ch. 8, page 42

Test your Visibility

When searching for bike lights, be sure to check the light output, which is measured in lumens. This determines how far your light will travel on the road. You should have at least 400 lumens to see clearly on dark roads. Once outfitted, check with a friend to test your actual visibility at the required distance of 500 feet.

Remember these tips

Seeing and being seen on the road are crucial to safely riding at night, so be sure to get the proper gear and grab a friend to test your visibility. If you don’t have a bike light, check out one of our “Operation: Illumination” events, where we will be giving away FREE bike lights. Remember these tips and feel free to share them with a friend!


Posted by johnnybikepgh

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