bike share is coming

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StuInMcCandless
Participant
#

Millvale riverfront park would be a good spot, both for recreational riders and commuters.


chrishent
Member
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Card is the preferred method for me, because I don’t have to whip out my phone and access the app for renting a bike. Regardless, it’s great to have many options for this, as opposed to only or two methods which half the users dislike.

As for future stations, other than the ones mentioned in the last couple of posts, I’d like to see (keeping in mind relative proximity to existing stations):

– One or two more along Liberty Ave between 33rd and the Bloomfield bridge
-East Ohio St business district, though this may have to wait until PennDOT is done with their work there
– Further up Central Northside, on Brighton and Pennsylvania
– Somewhere on Western Ave
– Regent Square, one near Forbes and another near D’s
– Science Center/Heinz Field/Casino area
– West End business district, though significant improvements will be required here in terms of infrastructure (there’s a couple of forum topics on this that I won’t get into)
– Begin expansion towards the southern ridge: stations at upper Duquesne Incline, Shiloh St, Grandview Park, Arlington-Warrington intersection, 18th-Brownsville intersection
– Two or three more stations further up Butler St.
– Start going up Highland Ave and/or Neville
– Two or three more stations in that triangle-shaped gap in the Golden Triangle between Liberty, Fifth, and Grant

And many more! Hell, it might even be cool to see a practically isolated set of stations between Beechview and Dormont, along Broadway


byogman
Member
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I rode from the station on north avenue over to BOA at Parkview the other day. The hub did skip here and there and the brakes seemed squishier than day 1.

It served the purpose, which was to get me (a lot closer to) home on a day I’d dropped off a bike and was without. Of course, there is no shortage of good candidate locations in squirrel hill that would have gotten me a lot closer still.

At the very, very, very least Murray just North of Forbes alongside the library needs to be in the next wave of expansion, almost no matter how small as both direct demand and connectivity to transit is really solid there.


edmonds59
Participant
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In semi-related news, my son just went to Ohio State in Columbus, so I got an email blast that the University is rolling out its own Bike Share system! called Zagster ! with 15 stations ! and 115 bikes ! For a campus of 50,000. :/ Aim low, Buckeyes.
Also it is not clear if and how the OSU system interfaces with the separate but equal city of Columbus system called CoGo, with 30 stations and undisclosed number of bikes. Seems like someone failed to communicate.
Whatever, the boy has his own rad bicycle and is rocking the place.


Daria
Participant
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I’ve only ever keyed in phone# and pin, and that’s so easy i can’t see bothering to get a card.


offtn
Participant
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Stu,

Millvale’s not in Pittsburgh.


chrishent
Member
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@offtn, I’m not sure that’s an issue in this case, with Pittsburgh Bike Share being a private organization. I would think that they could expand to any of the surrounding communities, though it’d be understandable if they choose to expand to other areas of the city before going outside its limits


StuInMcCandless
Participant
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…and down by the boat launch is right on the border. It might actually be in the city, depending on where it’s placed. In fact, I can see it being problematical if you placed too many bikes there, as it would rapidly become a park & ride, for which it does not have adequate parking to handle. That aside, if 100 people did park there and hopped on bikes to finish their commute, that’s 100 fewer cars trying to get in and out of downtown. We want that.


Daria
Participant
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millvale may not want it


edmonds59
Participant
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To temper my somewhat harsh cynicism of the OSU system earlier, it seems their system includes “ADA accessible bikes in OSU’s bike share … hand pedaled bikes, side by side tandems, adult tricycles, cargo bikes, and heavy duty bikes.” I don’t know that any other system I’ve seen does that. That’s kind of flipping awesome.
Also their system costs a little more than half per-bike than the Columbus city system. So perhaps they have some idea of what they’re doing.


paulheckbert
Moderator
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Casey Neistat make a fun little video comparing taxi, his own bike, and Citibike bike share, in New York City to see which was the least pain in the ass. He concluded that bike share was the winner! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po85lER-qRo


Marko82
Participant
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Pittsburgh’s bike sharing service starts off healthy
http://triblive.com/news/allegheny/9185988-74/bike-pittsburgh-program#axzz3nhFr0xdn


Marko82
Participant
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Citi Bike Stations: Landlords’ Latest Tenant Perk
Jamestown is the first New York City landlord to use a sponsorship program to bring the shared bicycle system called Citi Bike to the front door of its Falchi Building…
Although a Citi Bike station was installed about a block away from the building and a subway stop on the 7 line isn’t far, having a bicycle docking station right outside its doors was essential, said Michael Phillips, Jamestown president.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/citi-bike-stations-landlords-latest-tenant-perk-1444002742


paulheckbert
Moderator
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Maybe you could cut & paste the article for us, marko82, because I hit a paywall at WSJ.


Marko82
Participant
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Odd, it let me read it in full yesterday, but now I’m hitting the pay wall too.

Sorry about that.


ErinK
Participant
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A Chrome incognito window or something similar can get you around most paywalls.


chrishent
Member
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A behind-the-scenes look with Healthy Ride:

http://bikepgh.org/2015/10/06/behind-the-scenes-with-healthy-ride/

Some interesting tidbits, though I can’t say I’m surprised by the “quirk” mentioned in the post


chrishent
Member
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Hardcore:


buffalo buffalo
Participant
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that is a mighty suitcase to be squeezing into that rack…

(of course, in other cities, you could actually take bikeshare _to_ the airport, but….oh, never mind.)


chrishent
Member
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Healthy Ride releases ride data for 3rd quarter of 2015:

https://healthyridepgh.com/blog/2015/10/26/the-numbers-are-in/

The data is available to the public and is about as raw as possible. It includes:
– bike ID
– origin and destination stations
– trip date, time and duration
– user type

Obviously, it does not include user IDs. Over 40,000 bike checkouts were made during this 3 month period. You can analyze the data in any way you like.


DoubleStraps
Member
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Out of sheer boredom, I dug into the raw data a little bit. Here are the best and worst performing stations over the 3-month period… drumroll please…

Top 5 stations for bikes to be checked out of:

1) S 27th St & Tunnel Blvd (Southside Works) – 2,194 bikes checked out.

2) Forbes Ave & Market Square – 2,193

3) Liberty Ave & Stanwix St. – 1,961

4) 10th St & Penn Ave (David L. Lawrence Convention Center) – 1,846

5) 21st St & Penn Ave – 1,735

And the top 5 stations for bikes to be returned:

Erm, it’s exactly the same as the above, but with slightly different numbers (Southside Works had 2,487 bikes checked in, for example).

As for the worst performing stations, by bikes checked out…

1) Centre Ave & Kirkpatrick St – 70

2) Frew St. & Schenley Dr. – 103

3) Shady Ave and Ellsworth Ave – 212

4) S Euclid Ave & Centre Ave – 217

5) Centre Ave & Consol Energy Center – 263

The worst performing stations by bikes checked in is the same 1-3, but 4 and 5 are:

4) Centre Ave & Consol Energy Center – 169

5) Penn Ave & N Fairmount St – 212

The Centre Ave & Kirkpatrick St station had only 37 bikes returned to it! I’m going to dig a little deeper in a bit. I’ll also share the spreadsheet I created, if I can figure out how.


Benzo
Participant
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Zipcar is getting multi-modal and adding rental cars adjacent to bike share stations!

The new stations will put car rental and bike rental stations in the same place. The new Zipcar sites are:

42nd Street and Penn Avenue (Children’s Hospital)

Third Avenue and Wood Street (Downtown)

1st Avenue and Smithfield Street (Downtown)

42nd Street and Butler Street (Lawrenceville)

South Euclid and Centre avenues (Shadyside)

Ivy and Walnut streets (Shadyside)

12th Street and Penn Avenue (Strip District)

http://www.post-gazette.com/news/transportation/2015/10/30/Zipcar-adding-rental-sites-at-bike-sharing-stations-pittsburgh/stories/201510300270


chrishent
Member
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@doublestraps ha! you beat me to it. I too have been doing some data analysis. I’ve added a few fields, such as grouping stations in regards to what neighborhood they are in, and other nerdy crap. I ended up with a decent Pivot table that can tell you a lot of things. For instance:

– 31% of rentals are roundtrips, meaning the bike is rented and returned at the same station
– On that same note, roundtrips are the most popular trip of each station. The most popular non-roundtrip trip? Between 10th/Penn and 21st/Penn
– Nearly 84% of all trips are “flat”, meaning there is no relative elevation change between origin and destination (roundtrips are considered flat, even if the renter decided to use an HRB for Dirty Dozen hill reps). For this purpose, I consider all stations in downtown, South Side, Strip and the two on Butler to be at the same elevation. Same for those in the East End/Oakland. With that in mind, 10% trips are downhill and the remainder 6% are uphill
-35% of rentals are made by monthly members
– Most popular rental station during morning rush hour: 12th and Carson. Most popular return station in this same time period: Fifth Ave and Bouquet
– Most popular rental station during evening rush hour: 10th and Penn. Most popular return station in this same time period: South Side Works on 27th St
– Most popular day to rent a bike: Saturday
– Most popular bike: 70417, with 145 rentals
– Not all possible trip combinations have been made. For instance, apparently nobody has attempted to travel from the Market Square station to the one on Liberty Ave and Millvale in Bloomfield

And so forth (yes, I was bored). The data set is sufficiently comprehensive that you can determine what the average travel time was by monthly members between two different stations on Thursdays at lunch time. I can share this file via DropBox. DM if you’d like a copy, or I can post the link here later


Jamin
Participant
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Thx for the data wrangling. I’m wondering if either of you deleted any data before processing? I.e., a lot of “rides” took 1, or 3, or 9 seconds and were most likely people unable to pull the bike out, or people that changed their minds, etc. Not sure what an appropriate cutoff would be, but I’d say if the bike was out less than 180 seconds and it was returned where it was rented, that might be deleted. (Of course that could also give us an idea of % of problem rentals.)


chrishent
Member
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@jamin, I did delete some data. There were a little over 40,000 rides in the original data set. I whittled that down to 39,208, after I deleted all rides to and from the Healthy Ride office, as well as errant returns (i.e. bikes that weren’t returned to an official station for whatever reason).

From the remaining data, 2,988 rides were under 3 mins. 2,686 of these resulted in bikes being returned to the same station, suggesting problem rentals and, to a lesser degree, rental demonstrations. Of the remaining 302, a few seem to be legitimate trips. For example, 5 people have cruised down from 42nd and Penn to 42nd and Butler in under 3 mins.

While we are on the subject, 62% of rentals are under 30 mins (this includes the “problem” ones mentioned above). 18% are between 30 and 60 mins


chrishent
Member
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@doublestraps, regarding the worst performing stations, it should be noted that the one at Frew St. and Schenley Drive in Schenley Park only started operating in September. They had some problems with station connectivity so it was not in service until then. The first successful rental at that station dates from September 10. With that being said, the fifth worst performing station for rentals becomes the one on S Whitfield St and Baum Blvd in East Liberty (aka The Invisible Station), and the fifth worst for returns is S Euclid and Centre Ave (aka the Whole Foods one).

The station on Centre Ave and Kirkpatrick, the worst performing one by just about any key metric, has a lot of issues. For one, it’s geographically isolated, whereas all of the other stations are mostly clustered around each other. Getting to it involves climbing from pretty much any direction, and if you go from it to any station east, you’ll have to climb as well. I think this station should be relocated closer to downtown, near the Shop n Save shopping center. Or, when the system expands, they could close the gap by adding a station here as well. Not to mention the lack of bike infrastructure in the area, which is a deal-breaker for potential riders. Perhaps Healthy Ride could do more outreach around here to promote the system better, but I doubt that will have a significant effect.

Of the other stations, the one at Consol is perhaps an unsurprisingly unpopular one, despite being one of two largest stations in the system (35 docks, tied with the one on the North Shore). Other than the arena and two hotels nearby, there’s really not much else. Besides the occasional event, there was very little reason to go to and from there this summer. Perhaps now that hockey season has begun, use will pick up, but until the Civic Arena lot is redeveloped, there will be little reason to go here. That being said, I think this station would be more popular if it was located along Fifth Ave, where there are bars, restaurants and other businesses. The current location along Centre Ave is pretty much “out of sight, out of mind”


dmtroyer
Participant
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the fifth worst performing station for rentals becomes the one on S Whitfield St and Baum Blvd in East Liberty (aka The Invisible Station)

Interesting. I think 90% of my rides have involved this station.


Swalfoort
Participant
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The station at Consol Energy is the one closest my office. But, I find that I only rent from there. I do not return there. It is primarily accessible from Centre Avenue. You can get to it from Washington Place, but Fifth is one way inbound (I usually use the rental to jaunts into downtown, or the Strip). You could come back out on Forbes, but then you have a one block steepish downhill, to a light, then a one block steepish uphill to a light, where you would turn right to return the bike.

I’d rather return the bike to a station a couple blocks away, closer to downtown, BEFORE I have to climb up Sixth or Seventh Avenue from USX/Mellon. Crossing I-579 entails a nasty 2 blocks with odd traffic patterns (and one intersection was under construction for a bit this summer.) I don’t usually mind it on my own bike, with a helmet and hi viz clothing, but I don’t like it on a HelBike. I sometimes even rent/return at Stevenson Street, a few blocks further away from my office to avoid returning at the Consol station.


chrishent
Member
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@dmtroyer, I think the low number of rentals (281) and returns (290) there is due in part to the fact that it’s not a particularly visible station. It might get more use if it’s kept in the same general area but located on Penn, Highland, or Centre. Interestingly though, it’s the station where there’s the highest share of rentals and returns made by monthly subscribers – both figures are ~69%. The one with the lowest share is the station along the North Shore trail, with 11%


paulheckbert
Moderator
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I got an email. HealthyRide says “we’re giving all of our registered customers FREE unlimited riding between 7am-7pm this Saturday, December 12. With temperatures in the mid-60s this weekend, we hope all of our riders take advantage and go for a ride. Anyone new to Healthy Ride simply needs to register to take advantage of free riding. Register at http://www.healthyridepgh.com, our mobile app “nextbike” or call 412-535-5189.”


chrishent
Member
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For a limited time, Healthy Ride is offering annual memberships:

https://healthyridepgh.com/blog/2015/12/28/annual-memberships-available-through-march-1st/?platform=hootsuite

12 months for the price of 10


StuInMcCandless
Participant
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Had a Twitter conversation a bit ago with a bus driver and some bike users. What experience has anyone had with a HR bike on a bus rack? I’ve done it once, with positive results. It wasn’t a long or difficult ride, just downtown out to Parkway Center Mall. Those buggers are heavy, something like 37 pounds, but they fit fine.

Has anyone ever run into a bus driver who refused to take a HR bike on a bus rack? I’m told it’s happened. They should be OK, though. Those racks are good to 80 pounds. Two of them might be testing the limits of a bus rack, though. Or maybe that’s 80# per bike, maximum two. I don’t know, but I can find out.


Marko82
Participant
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“Yet More Evidence Bike-Share Isn’t Reaching the Poor” with some charts and graphs
http://www.citylab.com/politics/2016/01/bike-share-poor-equity-transit/424656/
But also something good in the article:
Earlier this month, the chairs of the Congressional Bike Caucus introduced a bipartisan bill (#faints) called the “Bikeshare Transit Act.” By designating bike-share systems as public transportation, the legislation would make them clearly eligible for federal funding


gg
Member
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I don’t know if the poor as a whole want to ride a bike or not? I know some that grew up very poor and never learned to ride a bike. That being said, there needs to be a desire by any group of people to actually want to ride a bike for transportation. Many would much prefer to be on a bus. I also feel there may be some poor that would make fun of others if seen on a bicycle. Sort of how people act in some groups if you have old beat up shoes on, instead of the latest Jordans. As crazy as that sounds to some, it is a reality for others. Lots of things at play in those statistics.


chrishent
Member
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ICYMI, Healthy Ride released their data for Q4 of 2015. As before, I deleted some data that is either irrelevant (trips to/from Bike Share office) or is bad. Some highlights:

Total number of trips: 15,931, down from 39k in Q3

76% of trips were one way (meaning different origin and destination), up from 68.9% in Q3. In fact, it’s worth noting that 17 out of the 50 stations have a one way trip as their most popular one. These stations are mostly in the East End and Oakland. This is in contrast with Q3, where all stations had roundtrips as the most popular trip. This, to me, suggests more commuting and less leisurely rides.

Most popular trip: Roundtrip on 27th/Tunnel way (Southside Works) station
Most popular one way trip: Boulevard of the Allies/Parkview to Schenley Plaza
Most popular stations: 10th/Penn, Fifth Ave/Bouquet, SouthSide Works, 21st and Penn, Liberty/Stanwix
Least popular: Centre/Kirkpatrick, Shady/Ellsworth, Euclid/Centre, Consol, Zulema St/Coltart

Station popularity by month (Q4):
Origin:
October: 10th/Penn (Total trips), Fifth Ave/Bouquet (one way only)
November: Same as October
December: Liberty/Stanwix (total), BOTA/Parkview (one way)
Destination:
October: 10th/Penn (total), 21st/Penn (one way)
November: Same as October
December: Liberty/Stanwix (total), Market Square (one way)

Most popular bike: 70493, 59 trips

1606 trips under 3 mins, 355 one-way. So almost 10% of trips are likely problem rentals.
75% of trips are under 30 min
12.55% are between 30 and 60 mins

22.8% of trips originated downtown, down from 27% in Q3; 20.44% originated in Oakland, up from 13% in Q3

49.6% of trips were made by subscribers, up from 35.8% in Q3

Most popular day to rent a bike: Sunday 16.72%; least popular is Tuesday at 12.43%

Most popular morning rush hour trip: Alder St/Highland to Bakery Sq
Most popular evening rush hour trip: 10th/Penn to 21st/Penn

Station with highest share of monthly member trips: Bakery Square (85%),
Station with the lowest share of monthly member trips: North Shore trail (16%)

Healthy Ride at 6 months:

Most popular stations: South Side works, Market Square, 10th/Penn, Liberty/Stanwix, 21st/Penn
Least popular stations: Centre/Kirkpatrick, Shady/Ellsworth, Euclid/Centre (Whole Foods), Consol, Whitfield/Baum

Most popular trip (all): 27th/Tunnel Way (South Side Works) roundtrip
Most popular one way trip: 10th/Penn to 21st/Penn
Customer share: 56% pay as you go, 39.8% monthly, 0.1% daily pass, 4.1% undetermined (this is mostly because of incomplete data from the station at Schenley Plaza)
Most popular bike: 70234, 186 trips


chrishent
Member
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HealthyRide will start redistributing bikes with bikes:


chrishent
Member
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Via WITF in Harrisburg, a study finds that property values have increased in areas of Pittsburgh with Healthy Ride stations. Said increase occurred after the stations were put in:

http://www.witf.org/news/2016/04/study-pittsburgh-bike-share-increased-property-values.php


buffalo buffalo
Participant
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Via CMU’s Students for Urban Data Systems, visualizations of various Healthy Ride data, including differences in day and hour of usage between monthly subscribers and other customers…

https://suds-cmu.org/2016/04/08/city-bikers-and-weekend-riders/


paulheckbert
Moderator
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As I biked around the city yesterday, I observed how well-located the bike share stations were to the day’s big events:

anti- or pro-Trump rally at Soldiers & Sailors: bike station just outside on Bigelow.
Pirates game at PNC Park: bike station right there on 6th.
anti-Trump rally at Smallman & 12th: bike station one block away on Penn.
Trump event at Convention Center: bike station right there on 10th. (pic below)
Penguins game at Consol Center: bike station outside on Centre.
Climate Change movie at Carnegie Lecture Hall: bike station on Schenley Drive.

All of the above were under one block away, but there was one that required a walk of 5 blocks (oy!):

Chelsea Clinton event in Highland Park: bike station on Whitfield.


Marko82
Participant
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Study: Bikeshare Riders Get In Far Fewer Crashes Than Other Cyclists

Study: Bikeshare Riders Get In Far Fewer Crashes Than Other Cyclists


Somewhat amazingly, there is actually yet to be a single death in the US that occurred during the utilization of a bikeshare service here. Considering that cyclist deaths are not exactly uncommon the US — some parts of the US are downright dangerous to ride a bicycle in or through, owing to insufficient infrastructure and careless drivers — that really is quite remarkable.

Full report PDF: http://transweb.sjsu.edu/PDFs/research/1204-bikesharing-and-bicycle-safety.pdf

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