Coming to Pittsburgh Tonight!: Bikestravaganza Tour

← Back to Forums


t
Participant
#

Yesterday I was sitting idle, and I was thinking. I do expect others to advocate for bicycle rights while I sit idle, that’s why I gave them some of my money,

These people here.

Lou, Erok, Lolly,

thank you Bike-pgh


edmonds59
Participant
#

Lyle, I noticed before that you were wearing a LAB shirt, you weren’t by any chance thinking of any specific instances (above), were you? There seems to be some wacky stuff going on over at the LAB.


Lyle
Participant
#

Maybe. I still can’t figure out why PeopleForBikes got started.


Lyle
Participant
#

Maybe. I still can’t figure out why PeopleForBikes got started.


reddan
Keymaster
#

I think we need extremists and moderates in a healthy community. Extremists are the ones blazing new roads and paths. Moderates are the ones laying the pavement and putting up the street signs.

Extremism without moderation is mostly sound and fury. Moderation without extremism is just status quo for the sake of status quo.

Gross generalization? Oh, yeah.


edmonds59
Participant
#

“A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.” Thomas Paine

That’s all.

Bikes for People is a bike industry funded initiative, hey, if they want to come at the problem from their angle, good for them.


erok
Keymaster
#

timito, you’re makin’ me tear up in my coffee.

Maybe. I still can’t figure out why PeopleForBikes got started.

diversity of tactics. eventually something will stick. yeah, it’s also industry funded, and part of our only capitol hill full-time bicycle lobby group. that’s probably why it looks so slick too.


Lyle
Participant
#

They should call it “the bike industry for bikes” then.


edmonds59
Participant
#

True. My guess is that it is a re-branding attempt to appeal to non-hard core folks who don’t immediately identify as “cyclists”. Oddly, Americans seem to trust huge, slick, faceless corporations more than they do their fellow citizens, whom we hold in great suspicion. I suppose we don’t trust anyone whose prime motivation isn’t profit.


AtLeastMyKidsLoveMe
Participant
#

Aside: (Um, according to the Supreme Court, corporations are citizens.)


erok
Keymaster
#

honestly, it’s about time the industry stepped up.


AtLeastMyKidsLoveMe
Participant
#

@erok: It sucks, but that is how the game is played at that level (slick, corporate-backed industry lobbyists). It’s probably stinky, but it’s a voice at the table.

(Any chance they take their u-locks into meetings? Any chance we could we get Jens registered as a lobbyist?)


erok
Keymaster
#

yeah, i know. i’m all for the industry doing what they can. imagine what chicago would’ve looked like if schwinn pushed to make sure every chicago resident could safely and happily ride their bikes around as transportation instead of just marketing them as toys. it woulda been like detroit, made for bikes not cars.


Lolly
Participant
#

I am also in favor of the bicycle industry getting involved. Look how much car manufacturers were able to apply pressure to asphalt America and wipe out streetcars, forcing people into cars.

Similarly, we need the bike industry to do their part to make the streets safe for people to use their products. It can’t be just the users of bikes working alone to change the face of streets and cities.


t
Participant
#

Buy, Planet Bike accessories, oh and Clank Works


Lyle
Participant
#

Look how much car manufacturers were able to apply pressure to asphalt America and wipe out streetcars, forcing people into cars.

I’m not sure this example advances your argument. Allegedly, GM acted in its own corporate interests and against those of the American citizenry. Which is precisely my point.

What assurances can you give me that the bike industry will act in my interests, and not their own? I think you imagine that our interests are aligned. I am not so naive.


dwillen
Participant
#

I can’t really conceive of how bike industry interests (making more money) could conflict with my interests (riding my bike more). I’m not saying it can’t. I just can’t think of an obvious way at the moment, though evil corporations continually amaze me in their shifty plots to make a buck.

It seems like the logical way to do this is to popularize cycling, which will call for improved infrastructure and better laws, which in turn gets more people riding (and buying) bikes. Maybe I’m naive. Perhaps this bike-industry spurred infrastructure is crap, and targeted for recreational riders, which would sort of conflict with my interests.

I suppose the other way is to ship even more manufacturing overseas (as if the bulk of that hasn’t yet happened) or make crappy bikes that fall apart and require the owner to frequently replace it, which would definitely conflict with my interests. Maybe they lobby for tax breaks for bike manufacturers, under the umbrella of “green”, but I, personally, wouldn’t really have a big problem with that.

Do you have a particular scenario in mind Lyle? Action on the part of bicycle manufacturers that you would be displeased with? I don’t have strong feelings on the subject either way, so I’d be easily swayed.


Mick
Participant
#

I don’t think the bike industry, which probably gets less than $1000 a year from a typical high-milage customer, will ever fund at the level of the car industry that gets 10 times that amount from a typical user.


AtLeastMyKidsLoveMe
Participant
#

The auto industrial complex exists to get people into cars and keep them there. I agree with dwillen, it stands to reason that the bike industry exists to get and keep people on bikes. It does seem to me the interests of cyclists and the bike-manufacturing industry are aligned.


scott
Keymaster
#

Let’s get back to making BikePGH look conservative. I like where that conversation was heading.


Lolly
Participant
#

I would very much like that as well.


Mick
Participant
#

Bike-pgh conservative?

We could put Scott and Lolly in suits.


Lyle
Participant
#

They exist to sell bicycles. And if they can do that by supporting (eg) places to drive to, that are fun for bicycling, that’s what they’ll do. Destination cycling is entirely antithetical to my interests. The industry lobby will push for the opening of every bit of parkland to mountain biking, and with all due respect to our offroad friends, that’s a set of politics that I don’t share (I don’t violently object, but it’s completely irrelevant to utility cycling). And if the industry lobby thinks that supporting a mandatory sidepath law, like the one that Florida just passed, would help it gain traction on one of its other goals, then they would surely do that. They don’t care if people actually ride those bikes, as long as they keep buying them. If they can sell bicycles as fashion accessories, they’ll do that, too.

I’m not arguing that the industry is totally evil. I’m sure my interests align more closely with theirs than with the interests of the automotive lobby. But I’d rather support an organization that represents cyclists, than one that represents corporations and uses “people” as a tool.


t
Participant
#

In a prior post someone mentioned street closures, what a great idea, “if” it could happen, “if” it happened, I like Friendship,

There are two major auto arteries that run parellel, more or less, traffic could be easily diverted. There’s a park. I have several traffic cones.


t
Participant
#

I believe Lyle is right. Although I like Destination cycling. I’m not interested in getting there by SUV.

I want to take my bike, and maybe a trailer, kids, a dog. When they finish that GAP trail into the city. That’s gonna open things up. Imagine commuting into the city from Mckeesport, by bike.

or an overnight camping trip, by bike.


t
Participant
#

Yeah, that’s a bad idea, no one’s gonna ride thier bike that far.

You can buy some nice racks to put your bike on your car, thereby taking your bike with you.

Just enjoy riding a bike. Tell your friends how you rode your Full Suspension Rig all over tarnation. “See all the mud” that’s what I tell my friend. All that mud.


eMcK
Participant
#

I wonder how many “destination” cyclists become “lifestyle” cyclists?


reddan
Keymaster
#

@eric: Me, for one.


edmonds59
Participant
#

Sometimes I put my bike on my car to drive to places where cyclists have been killed by innattentive drivers to ride to increase awareness of road safety and to try to make roads safer for everyone.

What “niche” is that?


StuInMcCandless
Participant
#

Probably the same niche as someone who bikes 14 miles SE of his house before work in the morning to start a 7-mile ride to increase awareness of road safety and to try to make roads safer for everyone. And then bikes 17 miles home at the end of the day.


Lyle
Participant
#

Sometimes I put my bike on my car to drive to places where cyclists have been killed by innattentive drivers to ride to increase awareness of road safety and to try to make roads safer for everyone.

What “niche” is that?

I don’t know, but I sincerely hope it’s not a niche that the bike industry tries to exploit for profit.


t
Participant
#

@ Stuln, that’s an impressive commute, especially, considering from what I can glean here, you’re not exactly a spring chicken. I might ride 14 miles over the whole day.

I finally got to riding some of the GAP trail a few weeks ago. One hundred miles, my first century ever. I will confess to stopping for a two hour nap.


edmonds59
Participant
#

Yeah, Stu man, you’re in a niche of your own. You’re a tough bird.


mark
Participant
#

i talked to someone yesterday who was talking about starting a fringe cycling advocacy group… that would really make bike-pgh look conservative.


eMcK
Participant
#

First rule of “fringe” cycling group: don’t talk about it on the “conservative” group’s message board.


mark
Participant
#

no way… being fringe isn’t cool unless people know you are fringe… therefore the above rule doesn’t apply.


Pseudacris
Participant
#

There were some interesting-looking Zines being passed around at the Bikestravaganza event, but I was sitting in back & focused on the visitor presentations. Well, I just found out that these are cataloged on LibraryThing & housed at the Main Branch.

(Thanks to librarian Jude Vachon for the info & for building the collection.)

← Back to Forums

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Click here to login.

Supported by