Empty wallets = more bikes?

← Back to Forums


wojty
Participant
#

I went into this article expecting the usual whining and complaining about expense related to cars, how there is no choice, yadda yadda. For a large part of the article, it did not disappoint. But then the great gem paragraphs at the end, from Davey Hamburgers (is that a real name? awesome!), made me feel so much better.

As for how the new rates might affect drivers, he said, “It stinks for theater-goers and tourists, but in the city, people should ride bikes.”


rsprake
Participant
#

To hear these people whine and complain is so funny to me. It screams of laziness and entitlement. I have never had an issue parking a car in any of the places mentioned.

But the reasons for the increase mattered little to college students in Oakland who said they have to run out of class to feed parking meters.

Businesses in Oakland should be rejoicing if the new prices gets students to either leave their car at home or park it in a lot. More open spaces for shoppers not taken up by long-term parkers means more business.


sloaps
Participant
#

Good mention at the end by Mr Hamburgers, but I’m still waiting for that news article that cites walking and biking as great ways to save on gas money – instead of the usual, tire inflation and trip consolidation …


ejwme
Participant
#

I know Pitt is cheaper compared to many other schools… but since when was it normal for college students, 80% of whom spend 80% of their year within the same 2 mile radius, to have a car?

Why, back in my day *squint, spit*, I remember when you had to wait for your job offer letter to walk it to the dealer (up hill, both ways, in the snow) to get your first Honda Civic. But that was when texting was called books. Or something.

Davey Hamburgers is awesome.


reddan
Keymaster
#

back in my day and But that was when texting was called books.

I’m feeling old enough today that texting was called smoke signals.


Lyle
Participant
#

grad students are college students too, in the vernacular. There isn’t enough asphalt in Oakland if driving to class was in any way normal for Pitt undergrads.

(ok, read TFM. OMFG what hard-hitting journalism. “I remember when my daddy drove us all to town in our horse and buggy there was a boy to hold the reins and we only had to tip him a penny. Everything now is just so horrible.”)


Marko82
Participant
#

Yeah I remember the car I used (occasionally) in grad school. I accidentally left the keys in the ignition while parked two blocks from Schenley high school on Center Ave. I parked it sometime before 8am when I TA’d a class, until my classes were over around 9pm. The poor sad thing was still there when I went for it.


rachel_ding
Participant
#

The lady who’s day was ruined while shopping because of a jammed meter makes me crazy.

I complain about my fair share of 1st world problems, but being on record complaining about that is something else entirely.


ieverhart
Participant
#

But the reasons for the increase mattered little to college students in Oakland who said they have to run out of class to feed parking meters.

Businesses in Oakland should be rejoicing if the new prices gets students to either leave their car at home or park it in a lot. More open spaces for shoppers not taken up by long-term parkers means more business.

I have friends who drive to class and expect to find on-street parking every day, or some large proportion of days. I can’t understand it.

Also, thumbs-down to the Pitt student who complains about increased bus fare. The mandatory security, safety, and transportation fee is $180 a year, which supports the use of a student ID as a “free” bus pass. Even if that doubled, it would still be a steal compared to Port Authority’s monthly pass rates.

← Back to Forums

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Click here to login.

Supported by