Japanese Knotweed

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zzwergel
Member
#

There are several patches of Japanese knotweed encroaching on the southern sidewalk on Butler St. between Suydam St. and the 62nd St. Bridge. What can I do so that I do not have to carry the cuttings home with me? Is it ok to take a paper or plastic garbage bag with the cuttings in it on a bus?

  • This topic was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by  zzwergel.

Eric
Member
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I’m not sure what you are asking and I’m not sure bike pgh message board is the best place for this.

Japanese knotweed has a large underground rhizome biomass so simply cutting the stalks won’t get rid of it. The city will need to spray herbicide, unfortunately. It will probably need repeated sprays to get rid of it.

I’m not sure why you’d take Japanese knotweed cuttings home.


PIT2MAD
Member
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Just hack it down and leave the clippings where the plant was growing. It’ll disintegrate within a few weeks. Better than the full grown plant, consider having done everyone a favor by leaving a “mess” behind.

It will keep returning, but I’ve noticed that with this dry spell we’ve had lately, the stuff that was cut over a month ago is still only a few inches tall. So best bet is to hack at it a few times a year if you use this route often, because like Eric said this stuff isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

This really isn’t the forum for this, but I often wonder if eventually nature will rebalance itself and native plants and animals will learn to eat and compete with invasive species like this. Also, do our native plants invade Asian countries? Or are their plants so badass that they just come here and outcompete everything? Much like their scholars and businessmen.


zzwergel
Member
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Personally, I think Japanese knotweed is a pretty plant just like Japanese, Korean, and Chinese women are pretty. At least Asian women do not block pedestrians and cyclists from traversing steps and sidewalks like their plants do. Since I have an appointment tomorrow, I will take some clippers with me and cut it down so that people can get through. Check out this post on my Instragram to see where I am talking about.

  • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by  zzwergel. Reason: Insert link

Eric
Member
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311 it.

If you bring back clippings and try to plant it in Aspinwall your neighbors are going to be upset when it invades their property.

And the species invasion isn’t just one sided. Species from all over the world spread elsewhere with trade.


zzwergel
Member
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I’m knot planning on planting it in Aspinwall. Pun intended.


paulheckbert
Keymaster
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I’ve had years of experience trying to eliminate or reduce japanese knotweed along the trail near Kennywood. I’m not a botanist but … cutting the plant back every month or two during the growing season (April to October) helps stunt its growth. If you keep that up for 3 years or so, you could kill an isolated clump of it. But where the plants are well established, the rhizomes (roots) underground are tens of feet long and help the plant to regrow fast and strong. Some people talk about a need for extreme care with cuttings (bagging & removal, throw into a nearby volcano, …) but I suspect that’s only true for roots, not above-ground cuttings.


StuInMcCandless
Participant
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My method was effective, when I kept at it. I pulled up the whole plant, as much of the rhizome as I could get, and just piled it all in one spot. I eventually pulled up a 40-foot square, and the pile was five feet high, six feet across, and ten feet long. The 2016 growing season was the last I worked at this, so I should go back and see how far down the pile rotted to in that time.

My limiting factor was deer ticks. They’d get all over me, such that I had to strip naked prior to entering my house, for the 15 minutes it took to perform a proper inspection of both the outside and inside of all (and I mean all) clothing. Because I sure as hell wasn’t going to bring any in the house if I could help it.

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