Love your bike. Lock it right.

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Elmo
Member
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Racks at the new Aldi on Baum and Roup in Shadybloomfriendsville.

Luckily there are other racks behind these that are actually useful. The racks are a little inconvenient to get to, but it is nice that they are inside.

The Aldi racks in South Side in the parking lot are not very good either. Is there some sort of requirement to have a certain amount of racks at a new building, and they are half-assing it to fulfill that requirement?

I love Aldi but this is real bush-league.


buffalo buffalo
Participant
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Glad to know it has some, somewhere–rode by there the other day, saw nothing but trees to lock up to, went to shursave where there’s at least a cart barrier near the door I can use… How do you get to these?


Benzo
Participant
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Wow, another great example of people who put a lot of time in to figuring out how to make a space for bike racks, and then fail at putting them in in the way they are intended. Bravo.

Had they move them a foot and a half back from the curb there, it would be great.


Marko82
Participant
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The racks at Aldis in South Side that are along Carson street are also too close to the building to be useful. I suspect it’s the contractor who is clueless not the store.

And yes I believe new commercial construction in the city is required to have some bike racks, with an incentive to put even more racks in to offset car parking. There’s a thread for it somewhere…

Edit for link: http://bikepgh.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Bike-Parking-Handout.pdf


Elmo
Member
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They can be accessed from the vehicle entrance/exit on Roup


WillB
Participant
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Are there any standards established in the building code for placement/design of bike parking? I assume there’s something like that for car parking spaces. Seems like a good BikePGH advocacy issue (if they’re not working on it already), especially if the next mayor is really committed to bike infrastructure.


Benzo
Participant
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I don’t know why this is so hard. Even REI, a place that sells bikes and caters to outdoorsy type people, placed their bike racks too close to the building, so you can only fill them up to 1/2 their capacity.

You need both sides of the coat-hanger type racks to be open since you’ll have issues with handlebars getting caught up otherwise. Good thing they went overboard on the number of racks, so it’s not a big deal.


Drewbacca
Participant
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The thing with REI is that they generally cater to people who can afford to bring their own bike rack. ;)


StuInMcCandless
Participant
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Suggestion for Bike-Pgh:

Add to the website a page of examples for anyone to look at, showing examples of “how to do it right” and “how not to do it”, re: rack installation. And make it dead-easy to find. And publicize the hell out of it.

Possibly this photo essay already exists somewhere, possibly more than one of them. If so, provide links. But if racks are going up left and right, and not being done well, then the word isn’t getting to the right people the right way at the right time.

I guess what the rest of us can do is keep providing examples of both.


Mikhail
Member
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Benzo wrote:Even REI, a place that sells bikes and caters to outdoorsy type people, placed their bike racks too close to the building, so you can only fill them up to 1/2 their capacity.


I think that there is a problem if someone decided to move rack further from wall.

But if make racks in half size and those get installed perpendicular to wall then we can increase capacity without taking a lot of walking space.


buffalo buffalo
Participant
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Here, for a change, an example of Doing It Right:

CMU garage on Dithridge at Henry, under the SEI; rack is just inside, between the entrance ramps. Only complaint is that the rack is just off centre–as visible in the picture, a bike on the ‘back’ side of the rack sticks out just a bit over the curb.


Benzo
Participant
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@buffalo buffalo – this is exactly how they did it at my workplace garage. 2 racks in a very small triangular space, but both racks are accessible from both sides, they are positioned perpendicular to each other. They are frequently at capacity during the summer months. Surprisingly, there are a lot of people cycling most of the winter too.


pinky
Participant
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Quick poll (dumping this in an old thread instead of starting new):

I need to run an errand downtown that will take about 45 minutes after work. The parking there has no camera but has nice bike racks. I won’t be able to see the bike from inside at all.

I forgot and didn’t bring my U-lock; instead I have my crappy combo cable lock because my workplace bike parking is very secure.

WWYD? Lock up with the cable lock downtown? Or skip the errand out of fear of coming out to a stolen bike?

I’m having a hard time determining my risk tolerance on this one.


buffalo buffalo
Participant
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How far is it from your workplace or some other secure parking? I might trade security for walking, here, but I rarely go downtown and have no idea how secure the area is anymore…

(Does Golden Triangle rent or sell locks? Maybe they should…)


pinky
Participant
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It’s about a 20 minute walk to my errand from my workplace, which would be fine except that I’m on a tight schedule tonight.

I could bike to other parking by a camera and loading dock and probably make it only a 5 minute walk. That’s definitely an option that makes me feel better.

Funny enough, I didn’t even think of it because I usually just park right in front of the place. I think I may have just acted like that person who cruises the parking lot looking for a front row space for my car. Only it’s for my bike.


Marko82
Participant
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I don’t think I would trust it with a cable for 45min. downtown, but I have an overactive loss tolerance. Can you remove the front wheel and take that with you? It would eliminate some of the desirability to steal the bike if you have to carry it away vs ride it.


pinky
Participant
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Can’t take the wheel with me, unfortunately. Blerg. I may just skip the errand and try again next week since I have approximately a trillion things to do this evening.

Battling voices of reason:

“It’ll be fine. There are so many other poorly locked bikes!”
“But I love my bike!”


jonawebb
Participant
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I would totally trust it. 45 mins? No problem. But it would be better if you could do like @marko said and take some important part with you — seat, wheel.


Pierce
Participant
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How many threads start with “I only left my bike there for a couple of minutes” It’s just a roll of the dice. Don’t know how many thefts happen downtown though, more frequent over in the East End I think (Bloomfield, Friendship, Lawrenceville)


pinky
Participant
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Update: the locking thing, in combination with a few other things, made it more practical to skip the errand yesterday. So instead I checked out the newly opened trail by Sandcastle, which I haven’t had a chance to use yet. It all worked out.


Marko82
Participant
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In another thread @Drewbacca posted a link to a Chicago bike theft website http://chicago.stolenbike.org/

Their automatic stats page isn’t working, but glancing at the first couple of pages shows that the vast majority of bike thefts in that city are from people leaving bikes in home garages or locked apartment storage lockers. Of the first 30 or so listings only 4 properly U-locked bikes were stolen out in the open, while 22 bikes were stolen in garages/lockers.

Just goes to show that thieves are primarily opportunists.


Drewbacca
Participant
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Opportunity + drug addiction, in many cases

“We meet the seller, he’s definitely not the thief. We show him my police report, list off all the parts, and show him a ton of pictures I had printed of the bike. The seller said he found the bike in a house he had bought off the bank, it had been a foreclosure because the people living inside were drug addict hoarders – there were a few bikes (mostly “plain steel frames” and mine “was the only nice one”) and a bunch of electronics.”


jonawebb
Participant
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Squirrel Hill. The parking meters are sorely missed.


andyc
Member
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It wouldn’t be difficult to just weld a head on the stumps.


ErinK
Participant
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When they started removing the meters I heard (maybe here?) that they actually educated the crews not to chop the ones with bikes locked to them. Unlike some other cities. But given the other stuff I’ve seen on this thread, I’d believe someone locked to this post after the meter was removed. A cable lock could easily be removed over a meter anyway. Glad these folks are around to distract folks from my bike!


RustyRed
Member
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So, I’m visiting my parents in Philly’s suburbs… we stopped at a grocery store in Yardley. I watch a woman ride her bike up to the front of the store, deploy the kickstand, park in the fire lane, grab her canvas grocery bags and head inside. Wow. No locking at all.


edmonds59
Participant
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Holy shit that bike is gorgeous. Mint condition vintage Raleigh 3 spd. The fact that someone is simply using this to get groceries in 2013 is spectacular.


buffalo buffalo
Participant
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I’m afraid the only thing to be said for this lock job, seen in Oakland, is “at least it’s not a quick-release”….


Marko82
Participant
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I rode past Heinz Field on Sunday during the Steeler’s game. It was nice to see so many bikes locked up all over the place. Unfortunately, the majority of the bikes were only secured with a cable lock; and some just through the front wheel. I wonder if it would be worth while for a group of us to place hang-tags on bikes during the next home game describing a more proper way to secure a bike. Does BP have any of these printed already?


Benzo
Participant
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Marko82 wrote:I rode past Heinz Field on Sunday during the Steeler’s game. It was nice to see so many bikes locked up all over the place. Unfortunately, the majority of the bikes were only secured with a cable lock; and some just through the front wheel. I wonder if it would be worth while for a group of us to place hang-tags on bikes during the next home game describing a more proper way to secure a bike. Does BP have any of these printed already?

This way the people with wire cutters will be able to quickly identify bikes to steal!


pinky
Participant
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Marko – I was there with the pink bike. As my husband and I locked our bikes together with a U-lock, a cable, and a cable lock, I reminded my husband of the old saying about bears and camping :)

But I agree – I think we had the only U-lock at the racks by Gate A.


Drewbacca
Participant
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there’s an old saying about bears and camping?!? O.o


pinky
Participant
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You don’t have to outrun the bear – just the other campers.


StuInMcCandless
Participant
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What do the racks look like? With the old toaster racks, for instance, about the only way you can lock the bike is with a cheap cable through one wheel.


pinky
Participant
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By Gate A they’re the T-shaped racks with two bars on the vertical portion.

Cross your fingers that this link works.


Marko82
Participant
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@stu, many bikes were locked to railing etc. If we put hang tags out, I envision it being on every bike, just blanket the neighborhood; that way we wouldnt be showing thieves the easy pickings.

Alternatively, I wonder how worthwhile a staffed corral would be? and if the Steelers or other entity would sponsor it.


andyc
Member
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For unconventional locking on some toaster racks, you can lift the front tire up and over the rack and lock from the front end of the down tube to the top of the rack.


helen s
Participant
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I have never owned a U lock, and only use a 1/4 thick cable lock. I have not had a bike stolen since 1972 or so when my old schwinn varsity was taken from a porch unlocked.
There is something to be said for where you lock it, how long you leave it, and what it looks like. I would not leave mine locked in plain view overnight anywhere.

Maybe the addendum to the bear story is that you can also look like you don’t taste good. Although bear attacks are usually not for food. Lions, sharks, orcas, they are another story.


RustyRed
Member
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Here’s some low-hanging fruit parked next to me at PNC Park. The cable isn’t even through the frame.


buffalo buffalo
Participant
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hard to tell, but i think the grey cable goes through the blue cable, which is wrapped around the frame… not that they both couldn’t be clipped in seconds…

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