New Trees along popular corridors

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caitlin
Participant
#

new trees are sproutin’ up around town as quickly as new bike racks–so exciting! I figured I’d give some info here about what I know since two rad cyclists contacted me about them….

The Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act made the plantings possible. The funding was made available through the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority to support green infrastructure projects across the state of Pennsylvania. In Pittsburgh, Friends of the Pittsburgh Urban Forest and TreeVitalize Pittsburgh received funding to plant trees as an urban stormwater abatement practice. (Treevitalize is a partnership between Friends, the City, the County, the DCNR, and the Western PA Conservancy to plant 20,000 trees in the region by 2012).

Anyway, you should see hundreds of new trees along Liberty, Penn, Brighton, Hamilton (I think) and Brownsville this fall and coming spring.

Also, Friends specifically is planting trees in parking authority lots in East Liberty.

So that is the latest in trees-along-roadways news. Trees help us cyclists when planted along roadways because they cool the air temp (which is awesome along liberty, right?), shade the pavement (pavement that is shaded lasts longer than pavement in direct sunlight all day) and slow down traffic, adding human scale to roads.

Now if only we could get them all along Baum (which is german for “tree”)


erok
Keymaster
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yeah, can’t wait for next summer, for more reasons than just the trees, but it’s pretty exciting.

stimulus money at work


erok
Keymaster
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yeah, can’t wait for next summer, for more reasons than just the trees, but it’s pretty exciting.

stimulus money at work


rsprake
Participant
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I saw the trees on Liberty, will be nice.


alnilam
Participant
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Lots of new trees, yay. I helped plant some of them, and it was great fun. I would encourage everyone to volunteer for planting next autumn.

Caitlin, do you have the source handy for trees reducing traffic speed? I’d love to read it if you do.


BradQ
Participant
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I’m wondering if I’ll get my tree tonight. They broke up the sidewalk Monday night, took away the concrete bits yesterday… Tree tonight? It’s not really mine as it’s in front of my next door neighbor’s house, but whatever. Close enough.

I live right on Liberty Ave. The city must be scouring their records—since I’ve been here they’ve put a bike lane right out front and now a sidewalk tree. I’m not sure what awesomeness will come next.


BradQ
Participant
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And the best part? In some form or another both examples — the bike lane and now the sidewalk tree — are due to the hard work of friends and friends of friends.

I love Pittsburgh.


caitlin
Participant
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I am trying to figure out when the trees are going in too… I see they have broken up a lot of sidewalk on liberty so maybe their method is to do all that then bring the tree? I doubt the rain has anything to do with it… they should be putting new soil in the pit too.


erok
Keymaster
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what are the chances that brad’s going to get one of those poop smelling ginkgo trees


BradQ
Participant
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Believe it or not I’ve got a saw or two in the basement of this old house that would make quick work of a poop tree.


netviln
Participant
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I know some cities ban female ginkgo trees for the poop smell reason.


StuInMcCandless
Participant
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Now if only we could get them all along Baum (which is German for “tree”)

Doesn’t this follow the old real estate adage, “Name the new thing after what you destroyed”?

But yes, a bazillon trees along Baum would be wondrous indeed. Go FPUF!


erok
Keymaster
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the Auto-Baum


rachel_ding
Participant
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whoa, that pun works two different ways.


rachel_ding
Participant
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like, uh, Audubon too.


Dave
Participant
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double double entendre


alnilam
Participant
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double double entendre entendre

fixed


caitlin
Participant
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actually we do not plant female ginkgoes in the city anymore. It is kind of interesting how many females there are as street trees.. i mean, people knew they were problematic when they were being planted 15-50 years ago, right??

we love the male ginkgoes though, a good shape, hardy, nice leaves, good fall color….no fruit

<you can eat the nuts inside the fruit if you take off all the gross part and roast them. one day i swear i am going to try it. or make an intern do it>


dmtroyer
Participant
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so I thought, evolutionarily speaking, that the idea of a sweet fruit was to subsequently spread the seed. this tree seems to counter that idea. what animal in history ate dog crap tasting fruit?


dmtroyer
Participant
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and of all the non-native asian trees to introduce here… why not eucalyptus like california got?


erok
Keymaster
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Given the slow rate of evolution of the genus, it is possible that Ginkgo represents a pre-angiosperm strategy for survival in disturbed streamside environments. Ginkgo evolved in an era before flowering plants, when ferns, cycads, and cycadeoids dominated disturbed streamside environments, forming a low, open, shrubby canopy. Ginkgo’s large seeds and habit of “bolting” – growing to a height of 10 m before elongating its side branches – may be adaptions to such an environment.


Boazo
Participant
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I think dung beetles like poop


reddan
Keymaster
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I think dung beetles like poop

Hence the name…


caitlin
Participant
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actually ginkgo is in the fossil record in this area…. so we can debate its native-ness :)

sadly the lovely eucalyptus and many other awesome CA trees wouldn’t survive, but you can get some that have been cultivated over time and selected for cold climates, like giant sequoias that don’t get as … giant.


sloaps
Participant
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sadly the lovely eucalyptus and many other awesome CA trees wouldn’t survive

what about monkey puzzle trees?


erok
Keymaster
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can we get palm trees?


eMcK
Participant
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I’ve got to take down a few trees growing to close to my house. one is a locust, sprung from the others I’ve got on my property, including a giant on the has to be 50-6- feet tall. I hope it doesn’t fal on my house when the time comes. The other tree is like a weed, grew like 10 feet in a year. I chopped it off about 3 feet from the ground and it is trying its darnedest to get going again.

I planted 4 trees this summer to make up for what I’m going to axe (well, chainsaw really). 2 Pawpaw trees and two others I forget. I like trees. Glad I have a big enough yard to have some. Glad the city is putting in more.


dmtroyer
Participant
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@erok fascinating


ieverhart
Participant
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actually we do not plant female ginkgoes in the city anymore.

Sounds like sexism to me.


Ohiojeff
Participant
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sadly the lovely eucalyptus and many other awesome CA trees

I was out in Santa Rosa, CA a couple of years ago and the people I was visiting blamed Jack London for the Eucalyptus trees and said they had become quite a hazzard fire and otherwise. They sure are spectacular though…

Props on the gingkos. That is one hardy tree.

Are any of these trees being planted with the fancy tree wells they put in at the August Wilson Center? That seems like a really cool idea and I’m hoping those trees thrive. So many street trees downtown seem distressed (or dead).


dmtroyer
Participant
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@jeffinpgh yeah, I was being facetious when I noted the eucalyptus. from what I understand it is invasive and problematic. but that’s okay, australia got rabbits.


Mick
Participant
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australia got rabbits.

North American got europeans.


alnilam
Participant
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North American got europeans.

Burn.


reddan
Keymaster
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Heck, N Am got humans via that whole land bridge thingy. Europeans were just the latest infestation…


spakbros
Participant
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I just met this guy, http://anthropology.si.edu/staff/Stanford/Stanford.html

who read an interesting paper about the evidence that the land bridge theory is whack.

The newest evidence suggests that the first people came from northern europe over an ice bridge! There are a ton of pre-clovis and proto-clovis artifacts along with mammoth bones being found 180 miles off the east coast that predate any west coast human evidence by quite some time.

The history books need to be re-written soon


spakbros
Participant
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I should add that humans did in fact cross the land bridge as well. Just much, much later


alnilam
Participant
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So these artefacts are being newly found right now? Or they’ve been found for a while but this guy is the voice saying “hey guys, look at the dates here”?

This is really cool.

Is it consistent with Blitzkrieg theory (that sudden human appearance is responsible for the extinction of all the mega-fauna that used to be in N America)?


spakbros
Participant
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the artifacts are being found off-shore by scallop fisherman and this guy just happened to talk to one. The fisherman told him that all the scallop boats have maps of mammoth boneyards under the ocean because they fuck up the equipment on the ships. The captain then gave him a mammoth tusk along with pre-clovis points and walrus bones that predated the oldest west coast points by 15 or 20 thousand years. Basically the shoreline then was about 180 miles further out and they find these right along the edges all the way down to about south carolina. I don’t know how this impacts the mega fauna situation but it sure did blow away the members of the east coast archaeological society. What a fun weekend that was.


spakbros
Participant
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some of my dates may be wrong. ugh. my gf is the archaeologist, I was just there for the free booze. This site has links to the pdf files for the original theory, the arguements and counter-arguements.


spakbros
Participant
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