NTSB recommends full ban on use of cell phones while driving

← Back to Forums


Pseudacris
Participant
#

BradQ
Participant
#

Into it, but I fear the cat is far too out of the bag given the way many of us (myself included) rely on our phones for navigation and music beyond strict communication uses.


Pseudacris
Participant
#

I imagine it will be about as easy as trying to change Car Culture itself.


Drewbacca
Participant
#

Not easy, but it’s the right thing to do. You can’t stop texting if people can still make excuses such as “I was just turning my phone off,” “I was checking the time,” etc. I hate the idea of loosing my talk time, especially during a long drive down a (not busy) interstate… but it’s a sacrifice I’m willing to make. I’ve already been hit once by a kid that was texting and fortunately I was in a car and not on a bike when that happened.

It’s not like we can’t pull over to program in a navigation route. The problem isn’t that we use phones, but rather how much of a distraction they are. People seemed to have lost sense about when it is time to pull over and regroup.


mr marvelous
Participant
#

I think of the demand corporate put on their employees, mrs. marvelous’s boss is on the phone 24/7 with work related issues. I can’t see this ever happening I’ve even seen our Mayor driving while on the phone. It’s a nice idea but the cancer has spread to far for treatment now.


orionz06
Participant
#

What about eating?


Noah Mustion
Participant
#

Oh whatever will people do if they can’t listen to their music or get from A to B using their seriously distracting device? It’ll be like… five years ago.


rice rocket
Participant
#

This isn’t gonna happen.

But, they should make cellphone related offenses ~3/4 of your allowed points on your license before it’s revoked. It’ll reduce some traffic on the road too. Win, win!


orionz06
Participant
#

Gotta make the punishment mean something. Lots of people are required to have a drivers license for work and report changes in the status of. Losing a license, even for a week, can really make someone think, and if not they will have a week to do so.


Pseudacris
Participant
#

The license AND the phone.


rice rocket
Participant
#

A week’s suspension won’t really make an impact… What are the chances you’ll get pulled over again in a week’s time? People drive without licenses all the time. I’d say at least 2 months to make drivers think about it.


orionz06
Participant
#

A weeks suspension with the vehicle impounded ? Since it won’t happen and we don’t enforce the laws we have now I would like to add to my 1 week proposal. We go 1 week with some form of verification that the suspended driver is not driving, whatever that may be.


reddan
Keymaster
#

I still like the idea of seizing and selling at auction any vehicle driven by an unlicensed driver. Makes driving on a suspended license a much more expensive gamble.

And, for people like bus or shuttle drivers whose jobs depend on driving, they and their employers have a much stronger motivation to drive as safely as possible.

Again, talking about things that won’t happen.


salty
Participant
#

Well, of course today the news is full of the “backlash” about how the “nanny state” wants to “take away our freedom”.

So, I have a proposal that should appease everyone: how about, if you see someone texting while driving, it’s legal to shoot them in the head and cite self defense?


orionz06
Participant
#

I fail to see the use of a cell phone as a “freedom.”


reddan
Keymaster
#

@orionz: I suspect that the freedom whose loss is being bemoaned is the freedom to do whatever you want, whenever you want, with no concern for consequence.

How dare anyone suggest that I change my behavior to conform to someone else’s rules! I can rationalize my actions in dozens of ways (all of which boil down to “It’s different for me”)!


WillB
Participant
#

For me, the issue is not that there is some immutable right to talk on the phone while driving (and let’s be honest, talking on the phone is only one of dozens of ways that we get distracted while driving), but that the impositions on privacy and liberty required to enforce this proposed ban go beyond what I’m willing to accept. Notice that NTSB calls for banning hands free devices, but would allow systems installed by the manufacturer. How are they going to determine that? We’ve got another thread going right now where people are (rightfully) complaining about the behavior of police, yet in this thread we’re arguing for giving them more power to arbitrarily pull people over. Were you singing to yourself in the car, talking to a passenger? Well, the cop thought you were using an unauthorized device, so he pulled you over anyway. Maybe that’s acceptable to some people, but it isn’t to me, and it’s not just because I want to be able to talk on the phone while I drive.


stefb
Participant
#

And then there is this: the officer bent over while driving to pick up a fu!kin pen.

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2011/12/miami-cop-drives-patrol-car-up-utility-pole/


dmtroyer
Participant
#

Will,

Our ability to operate a motor vehicle on public roads is not a private matter, unfortunately, and there are some terms to the usage thereof. I believe that precedent was established some time ago.

Thanks!

David.


Vannevar
Participant
#

This could be the second step in rationalizing the “car society” – I’d say first was seat belts in the 1960s (i think), and the rhetoric about nanny-state impositions then is about the same as it is now. (“they can’t make me wear a seat belt..” funny, now everybody wears one.)

So they’re recommending that we prohibit a known distraction that kills people? It’s okay with me that it’s a bite of the apple and not the whole apple.

In general, NTSB recommendations are unassailable from a scientific perspective – although they are, at times, a pain in the ass (which means, a forced change of habit). If the politicians decide to listen – well, that’s another question.

My penalty for texting/phoning while driving would be that your cellphone number is released to Telemarketers, Religious Organizations, and Fundraisers on a “please-do-call” list. That’ll be an effective deterrent.


edmonds59
Participant
#

“”they can’t make me wear a seat belt..” funny, now everybody wears one.”

My bro in law who’s a Pgh police officer refuses to wear one. Or observe speed limits. Wait, which thread am I on???


stefb
Participant
#

I was complemented this past weekend by a friend who was in town about how I drive the speed limit and how I totally stop at stop signs. I do mean to brag about this, because it seems that I do this better than law enforcement officials.

Edmonds, you should invite your brother-in-law to a flock ride sometime.


edmonds59
Participant
#

My brain is not sure how to process that combination of images.


boostuv
Participant
#

Or we could just implement tougher/more comprehensive drivers education programs and stiffer penalties for those who break the laws. Most of our laws are about “band-aiding” the problem instead of actually fixing it. Laws on drinking, drug usage, driving, etc… attempt to fix what a lack of education causes.


Marko82
Participant
#

My solution to some of these bad behaviors is to let the free market determine the punishment. Wreck your motorcycle while not wearing a helmet results in your insurance company not paying for your injuries. Same for seatbelts. Likewise causing an accident while talking on the phone, speeding, running red lights, etc. The gov’ment doesn’t have to pass more laws, just hit people in the wallet. Ever notice how people won’t turn in a minor fender-bender to their insurance because they don’t want their insurance to go up? Yep that’s my solution; if you get a ticket – your insurance rates go up.


steevo
Participant
#

I heard a thing on NPR once about a neighborhood

group in DC who all pledged to drive the speed

limit. I drive the speed limit 99% of the time

in the city and have literally been passed by

cars on liberty ave. I think speeding is more

dangerous than phones, and that will never be

enforced.


brian j
Participant
#

Steevo, there was a previous discussion here about that group in DC. I think you got a sticker on your vehicle, too. I’m too lazy to find the link, though.

I agree about speeding. Heck, I’ve passed on Thomas Blvd in Point Breeze, and I watch people zoom by my house in Morningside all the time.


Pseudacris
Participant
#

Plenty of people indulge in simultaneous speeding/texting.


stefb
Participant
#

Cburch screams at people speeding past our house in morningside. A guy tried to get out and fight him once.


cburch
Participant
#

I was cleaning out my truck at the time and happened to have a machete in my hand. He thought better of it


mr marvelous
Participant
#

machete? oh that movie was about you.

machete_two_guns_poster1a


reddan
Keymaster
#

Geez, a guy possesses useful lawn-n-garden equipment, and people just jump to conclusions.


cburch
Participant
#

Doing a lot of trail building means that I generally have things like axes and machetes and picks and shovels lying around in random places.


mr marvelous
Participant
#

To hide all the bodies?

Seriously thats why I don’t road rage you never know when you’ll come face to face with machete.


stefb
Participant
#

Colin’s blazer has a lot of bicycle stickers on it. Just stay away from that :)

Ps-machete was a great movie, btw


Pseudacris
Participant
#

NYTimes article on texting while doctoring.


stefb
Participant
#

That is interesting. I have only occasionally noticed a nurse in the middle of a 6 hour surgery when nothing is really happening on her end look something up on a computer. I have heard of doctors in other hospitals with a bluetooth headset inside of his helmet making calls during surgery, but I don’t remember who that was. The only time I text at work is when I am not directly caring for a patient and need info from my office manager at the other office, or if I give my husband an update as to when I am coming home. But I am 30 and most of the staff at the hospital is older than me, and a lot of them don’t have a smart phone and don’t even text with the phone that they have. The residents are younger than me now, and they behave appropriately. I have to point out that surgeons have listened to music in the OR for years and as far as I know, that isn’t a huge distraction.


edmonds59
Participant
#

Surgeon: “Has anyone seen my Bluetooth?…”

….

..

“Who was that last patient?”


cburch
Participant
#

Everyone loves a delicious junior mint!


Pseudacris
Participant
#

@stefb your comments about the place you work are reassuring. I once decided to skip using a surgeon I was referred to because he chewed gum during the entire consultation and I kept imagining him dropping a piece in me during the surgery (even though I know it’d probably end up inside a paper mask). He ignored a few sanitation basics, too, but that’s another threadjack…

← Back to Forums

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Click here to login.

Supported by