PA Bike Rt. A

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zzwergel
Member
#

What would be the quickest and easiest way to get from the T or PAT bus with an at most 40 minute headway to PA Bike Rt. A?


Mick
Participant
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I’ve gone south using the T, then going to Rt A.

I got off off at West Library, then went Churchhill Rd -> R on Sugar Camp  -> R on Bebout -> L on East McMurray -> L on  Thomas Rd  ->  R on  Linden Rd ->  R on Thomas-Eighty-four  Rd -> Rt A at PA Rt 519.

I’m thinking there might be a way  from  the Library stop (not West Library)  totake the Montour trail to Rt A, but Google bike directions is not showing that.

South of I-70,  PA bike Rt A is is pretty nice.   North of I-70 it’s pretty similar to any other trashy road.

Also, I did this before you could put bikes on Buses.  There is likely a way to get closer to where you want to go than the T.  I was packed for a 5 day trip, so that would not have been a very good option for me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


zzwergel
Member
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@mick,

I will do it if someone wants to do it with me. I-70 is pretty far from any T station or PAT bus so it will have to be over several days. I do not drive, own a car, or have a drivers’ license (Probably never will).


Steven
Participant
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I took the Montour Trail from Library to Route A back in 2008-2009, as part of a couple of bike rides to Washington PA. I just exited the trail at East McMurray and took it west to Morganza Road and into Canonsburg to get on Route A, then followed it to Route S into Washington. It was an OK route. The part on McMurray and Morganza wasn’t any worse than the part on Routes A and S.

One simple but perhaps unhelpful answer to your question of the quickest way from any PAT route to Route A is to take the 21 bus. Get out at any stop in Coraopolis and you’ll be on Route A. And since Route A runs along the Montour Trail for part of its journey, you could also take a 28X to Ikea and then ride down to the Montour Trail, and you’ll be on Route A too. Or the 29 bus. But I assume you’re not really asking about the parts of Route A that are on the Montour Trail.


fultonco
Member
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Both of these are good suggestions.  Another option is to take the T to Library and then take the Montour Trail in a West Northwest direction to Bicycle Route A, which is Route 980, near the new bridge over Route 50, in Venice.  After that, you can head south on 980, which will take you to some of the the calmer portions on the route.

However, as I indicated in previous post in Paul Heckbert’s thread (trails within 100 miles of Pittsburgh), there has been quite a bit of development in Northern Washington County, without any significant improvements in the roads of the area.  This has produced a lot more traffic than was present in the past.    Route 519, which used to be a sleepy country road now has quite a bit of fast moving traffic, especially at the morning and afternoon rush times.

As was mentioned above, a drop off in traffic occurs south of I-70 but not really until crossing US-40, at Glyde.  You get a reprieve for about 20 miles, until the route joins US-19, heading toward Waynesburg.  It too is a sleepy road, at times but there is no shoulder in many areas and there is also some fast-moving traffic as you head toward Waynesburg.

I’m not trying to discourage you or anyone else, just making you aware of what to expect.  The state sanctioned Bike Routes, with which I am familiar, are nice ideas but some of the roads they follow need some significant accomomdations for cyclists and pedestrians, if they are to be more enjoyable and safe to travel.

I have an interest in Bike Route J, in central PA, and have been riding sections of it as time allows.  It too has some nice sections but also some unpleasant riding on high speed roads, such as PA 147, 405, US 11/15 and US 322.

  • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  fultonco.

zzwergel
Member
#

@Fiultonco,

As I said, Someone would have to go with me because of the distance to any form of public transportation which can take me back to Pittsburgh and Aspinwall. Also, I-70 is too far from any transit service to make it there in one day and some overnight camping will be necessary.


fultonco
Member
#

OK.  I would need more information about what it is that you hope to accomplish before being able to come up with a plan.  It is clear that you would like to access Route A, in the South Hills and then to get to and below I-70.  How much further do you want to go on Route A?  All the way to the West Virginia State Line, at Mount Morris?  To Waynesburg, or just a little foray into Southern Washington/Northern Greene Counties?  When you get to your end point, do you plan to ride back or do you want some sort of transportation all the way back to Pittsburgh or simply back to the T or a Port Authority Bus?


fultonco
Member
#

I mapped out a possible route for you.

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/26510868

I’m not aware of any campgrounds along that section of the route.  In warmer times of the year, I’m sure you could stealth camp along the way or perhaps a property owner might let you camp.

There are hotels and other services, such as restaurants and stores along Route 21, in Waynesburg, PA.  You would have to go off Route A to access them but not more than a 2-3 miles.  Route 21 can be busy in that area.  It is a 4-laner with high curbs on each side and no shoulders.

I extended the route to Morgantown.  Route A ends, remotely at the state line, a bit south of the small town of Mount Morris.  The last time I was there, there was a gas station/convenience store in town, but not much else.  Morgantown has trails and services, including lodging.  It may be possible to get transportation back to Pittsburgh from there, as well.


zzwergel
Member
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@fultonco,

I do not have a lot of money to be spending on hotels and buses as I don’t have a job. Also for some odd reason, possibly autism related, I am scared of employment. Would being a bike messenger be a good first job for a 26 year old man?


fultonco
Member
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Understood.  In light of your circumstances, I recommend waiting for warmer weather because stealth camping at this time of year would be difficult.  If money is an issue, you could ride back to Library, from the state line and take the T back into town.  Approximately 75 miles, each way and roughly $7.00 in public transportation costs.

I’ve never been a bike messenger, so I cannot answer that question for you.  Perhaps there are others in this group who can.  I would imagine that, like a lot of jobs, being a bike messenger has its duties, responsibilities and expectations that must be met.  After knowing the requirements, you will have to decide if it is your cup of tea.  I think it would be an interesting job to have and everyone has to start somewhere.

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