Rear Hub / Cassette Rebuild Replace or (Re)lube

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Mildsnbleu
Participant
#

Friday I bought a new (to me) road bike off of a guy at work. He recently upgraded to a Felt F5 Carbon race bike some where in the $2000 range, and I was happy to take his former roadbike off of his hands. I bought an early 2000’s Bianchi Pinerella Boron Steel road bike with a carbon fork and Shimano 105 components. It was quite a deal priced below what CL usually has.

I did notice a few things that I will be addressing and I wanted your opinion on them.

The rear wheel bearings sound like it is grinding a bit, like there is no lube in the hub. I cannot tell if this is rear hub, cassette, or bottom bracket. Tonight I will be taking things apart to see if the crank arms spin freely or if there is binding in the bottom bracket. If there is noise and resitance, I guess I will replace the BB cartridge.

Now the real question. For the rear wheel, what is involved? What is involved in repacking the hub and is this something I should attempt or leave to Thick or Iron City.

Before I get too carried away, I am going to relube all of the componets and see how that works, but I feel there is more to be done.

Provided that I don’t need any new parts (hub or cassette). What price should I expect for this in a shop? 20 – 50 dollars? What would you guys do? I have a pretty good assortment of bike tools and have been pretty handy so far. But this is a bit out of my league.

Let me know your thoughts.

-Dave


Ohiojeff
Participant
#

Is it a Shimano 105 hub in back or….?


reddan
Keymaster
#

You might want to look at the Park Tools site: see if the job looks to be within your capabilities and comfort level.


Mildsnbleu
Participant
#

Shimano 105 9 Speed Cassette(11-25)/Hub /Derailleur


alankhg
Participant
#

Hubs aren’t too bad to work on. If you’ve ever taken apart anything on an older bike you know how cup-and-cone bearings work, where you have to preload them in smooth adjustment with a locknut. If you’re not aware you might not want to learn on your new fancy bike. (But you could play with some old wheels at Free Ride if you want to learn.) Otherwise there’s nothing too complicated in the hub. You just pull it together, regrease the bearings, and then put it back together, making sure you have them preloaded properly.

http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=45

But if you want someone to do it for you it looks like Thick charges $17:

“Overhaul loose ball hub, including cleaning, new grease, and adjustment 16.99”

http://www.thickbikes.com/repair.php


Ohiojeff
Participant
#

This is one of the first repair jobs I ever learned how to do on a bike. It’s really a matter of patience (and keeping tracking of loose ball bearings!). The real limiter for you might be the tools you’d need. You’ll need a casette lockring tool, a big wrench, a chain whip, a couple of cone wrenches of the proper size etc. It runs into some money up front but then you have them…. I’m pretty sure the 105s are cup and cone. The Freehub body might need to be lubed as well, that’s a bit more of a pain.


joeframbach
Participant
#

From the Thick repair page: “Cure Shimano’s sticky shifter disease: 20.00”

What? I had a feeling Chris could cure diseases.


rsprake
Participant
#

I have a sticky singlespeed freewheel. When I walk my bike it looks like I have a fixed gear.

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