Repaving Centre/Penn Circle

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erok
Keymaster
#

i hope to have a blog post next week that will explain a bit more


ejwme
Participant
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now THAT’s an American dream I can get behind.

erok – I’ll wait patiently for details :D


sloaps
Participant
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Verona Road Painters, Inc., has a nice ring to it?

Provided you enjoy traveling, having a Woman-Owed Business Enterprise which supplies specialty pavement markings to DOT’s and municipalities could be pretty lucrative. Government contracts require some participation from Minor-Owned, Woman-Owned or other Disadvantaged Business Enterprise.


ejwme
Participant
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you guys are total enablers. keep it up. I’m starting to see little reason not to do it at least part time.


StuInMcCandless
Participant
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Canadian, and done for free, but http://urbanrepairs.blogspot.com/

EDIT: Great quote from halfway down the page:

“They are perfect for Victoria with its narrow roads and tight budget,” says OURS spokeperson, Yukon Duit. Sharrows are short for “Shared Use Arrow”. They are bicycle-and-chevron markings indicating a shared use lane. The markings are used in cities across North America and Europe on roadways that cannot incorporate a full bike lane. [emphasis added]


Pseudacris
Participant
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Perhaps we could commission this device?

http://vimeo.com/6075609


edmonds59
Participant
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I’m loving the Urban Repair Squad. That’s going to kill some time.


Noah Mustion
Participant
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stefb
Participant
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Single speeds, perhaps fixies without any brakes on the handlebars?!?!


quizbot
Participant
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Taking a break from the bike polo match, as it was played in a more civilized age.


ieverhart
Participant
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Why commission the Streetwriter when we’ve got Pittsburgh’s very own Chalkbot?

@ Noah – The full record, as you perhaps saw, unhelpfully identifies it as “unknown Pittsburgh neighborhood.” Before I read the other reply, I also had guessed it might be Oakland, but it’s not much more than a guess.


erok
Keymaster
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yeah, well i suppose chalk might last longer than the paint they use


Lyle
Participant
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Three of those bikes have “rod brakes”. I don’t remember when the coaster brake was invented, and I can’t see one on the other two anyway. Also, one has a headlamp of marginal utility. I suppose if there are no streetlamps and car headlights, you don’t need as much light to see by.

Also, those girls look like they really rode. Still no cleats on the shoes tho :(


erok
Keymaster
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it looks like the rod brakes are the kind that press down on the tire itself, making me wonder whether this was before pneumatic tires. also, if you look closely on the forks, you can see the little pegs sticking out from the side. it’s where people would rest their feet when going downhill because the pedals were going too fast due to the fixed gear


salty
Participant
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are you sure the pegs weren’t for pulling sweet fixie tricks?


Ahlir
Participant
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The caption says “Portrait of two men and two women”. Yet there are 5 people in the photograph. Hmm.

I can’t find any valves on the tires, so maybe they are solid. (This gives a whole new meaning to the expression “wearing down your brakepads”). Also, might be me but the bikes seem huge in comparison to contemporary ones.


Lyle
Participant
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The people were shorter then. Also, clearly, one of the people in the photo, isn’t. Else the caption would say “three men.” Photographic evidence of pre-Roswell visitations, I say.


Ahlir
Participant
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My money is on the kid on the right being the alien… he just seems too young compared to the others.

At last, I can say: “Don’t trust anyone under 30.”


robjdlc
Participant
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Ejwme: You start up a road painting service that resolves the bike lane issue in this city and you can count me in as someone with years of experience handling and maintaining the machinery and chemicals that do the deed. Level of seriousness: very high.


edmonds59
Participant
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The guy in the middle of that photo is a badass. A no-brake fixie, with the bars 8″ lower than the seat, that’s a serious track position. And, whatever the exposure was for that photo, never blinked. Badass. He probably forced the others to ride enormous frames in a attempt to make them more manly. Didn’t seem to be working. Except for the women.


StuInMcCandless
Participant
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I love both directions this thread is taking.

First, back to line painting (again): You want enabling? Try this video. Made in Pittsburgh by a well-known Pittsburgher, no less.

Second, back to the four^H^H^H^Hfive people in the photo, I too was looking at the tall man in the center. Those handlebars would be truly cool in any decade or century. And both the women look badass enough in their I’m-guessing-1915 way, on the ground as the one is. Women? On a bicycle? How dare they exercise their independence! They probably just came from a suffrage protest!


Tabby
Participant
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rob and ejwme- my level of seriousness and ability to get equipment also very high


Lyle
Participant
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I figured it was the unblinking giant that was the alien. He’s probably the one that brought bicycles to this planet in the first place.


ieverhart
Participant
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The date is listed as 1909-1930. They’re crazy if they think this could have been taken in 1930. I’m almost positive this is pre-World War I.

Aaaand having another look at the page, I may be right (for once):

Source: John Gates Photograph Collection, ca. 1890-1910, AIS.1991.22, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

Although if they can mess up a count of “number of people in this picture,” they can probably fudge the year, too.


ejwme
Participant
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I was just about to post about the date – two ranges are given, one is 1890-1910, the other is 1909-1930. Assuming both date ranges have some form of legitimacy, that puts this photo at 1909-1910.

I need to understand what we’re talking about in terms of painting lanes. The videos and blogs flying around on this thread are all guerilla, some involving arrests (haven’t seen the local vid yet, going to have to wait for youtube access on a different network), but talking about it on a public forum where identities are easily deciphered lends an air of legitimacy.

So what are we talking about? I’m all for either one, or both. It’s just a matter of approach and where the discussion takes place ;)


Ahlir
Participant
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@ejwme, we’re just talking. Have you noticed that pretty much all of the threads on the board eventually wander off into some arbitrary direction? We’re like that.

Anyway, I took another look at the photo and I’ve decided that this is actually a family portrait. The fellow in the middle is the father, the woman on the left is his wife. The rest are their children. Also, his bike is the only that appears to have a ringer; clearly the leader. (I won’t speculate on the somewhat creepy doctoring of the daughter’s eyes.) Sorry, no aliens here, move along.

As for the other sub-thread: I keep wanting to go to the Home Depot to buy a can of spray-paint. Then I want to go out and start tagging all these road hazards that I keep running into (and don’t always remember). I’m pretty sure I could go through a couple of cans of safety-yellow or orange in a week or less. That would be guerrilla to me.


Noah Mustion
Participant
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After looking through a shit-ton of those photos I can tell you that they didn’t do much work in narrowing down the dates for the majority of the photos… some of them have a very wide date range that probably reflects the shooting career of the photographer.


Lyle
Participant
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Judging by the style of the hats, the number of buttons, the solid rubber buttons, and the leaves on the trees, my best guess is early June, 1903.

Someone should look at the EXIF tags and see for certain.


robjdlc
Participant
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During the last trail cleanup (possibly earth day?) someone tagged all of the trail hazards along station square (killer roots anyone?)

I’m not suggesting any kind of geurrilla action as much as I’m suggesting a privately owned group that puts down legit lanes, so organizations like bikepgh didn’t have to deal with local gov’t to get a simple job done. Could be complicated…


dwillen
Participant
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Ahh, that was clean up people tagging the roots. I figured it was some city crew that went out there and did it. I was wondering why they didn’t just fix the crap instead of tagging all of the hazards.


Ahlir
Participant
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@robjdlc: I have noticed the tags on the SS Trail! Particularly the one on the Vlad-the-Impaler train rails, on the bit you’d have avoided had you followed the trail “detour” signs. Whoever took the time to do that is a hero.

I have to admit that I have much more confidence in local government that I have in “privately owned group“. The latter are responsible to no one and, in the long run, are only interested in perpetuating themselves.

In a democracy we have the option to decide, regularly, at the ballot, on our collective priorities. The reason stuff doesn’t just happen is because competing constituencies, in principle, all have a say. Sometimes we win, sometimes we lose. I don’t have the energy to work for a dictatorship, so the current system suits me just fine. (Paradoxically, I probably have the energy to whack people who might want to do so.)

Anyway, individual action is key. Propaganda by the deed, but in a good way.


ieverhart
Participant
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Bravo on tagging the South Side “irregularities” in the pavement. I had likewise assumed it was the city marking them for future attention.


Morningsider
Participant
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Having worked as a contractor for several government agencies, I can safely say nothing gets done quickly. Ever. If you started now, you could be painting by fall of 2011. Unless there is money sitting around (that does not need to be approved by a council) with no one to do the work; in that case, I can be painting by the end of the week (if it stops raining of course).


erok
Keymaster
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Unless there is money sitting around (that does not need to be approved by a council) with no one to do the work

BINGO


ejwme
Participant
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I wouldn’t be interested in perpetuating myself and merry band of helpers, I’d be interested in getting bike lanes and sharrows on pavement. Once that is done, I’d be free to seed bomb barren land, collect and recycle roadside litter, and otherwise pick up the tab where our elected officials seem to have missed the point by being mired in red tape and politics.

I don’t trust people who do it for votes any more than I trust people who do it for profit. But I’m not interested in any of their excuses for why it costs so much or takes so much time. I’m interested in whether it gets done or not.

In the past 100 years since those photos were taken, 100% of the county roads were paved an average of what, 10, 20 times? – that’s over 800 miles of county roads, so that’s 8,000 – 16,000 pavings. By comparison, how many miles of bike lanes do we have painted, on any roads? Not paved, just painted. And how many times were they painted?

Yes, there’s scads of industry surrounding road paving and car use, propping up politics and whatnot. What I’m saying is I’m not interested in that, that horse is dead. I’m interested in why, in 2010, they can’t put paint brush to pavement or let someone else do it? Great, the past sucks – lemme get a hanky for the tears. So why are they allowing the present (and pending future) suck as well?

If they’re looking for someone with LLC after their name and a bucket of paint to bid lower than anybody else to improve on the situation, fantastic, I’ll get right on that. Heck, I’d swallow the cost and do it just for the kicks of putting one of those signs with lit up arrows on my bike and taking the lane down ARB :D

So Erok, if I buy paint, can you get the city to deputize me?


ejwme
Participant
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See, I take too long to type. Let Morningsider do it! I’d have to wait until the weekend.


Morningsider
Participant
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This is from the historic website posted earlier in this thread: According to the pamphlet, “Pennsylvania Trolley Museum,” horse-drawn street railways began in 1859 when the Citizens Passenger Railway started to operate on Penn Avenue to 34th Street, later extending to East Liberty, a trip lasting one and a half hours and costing sixty cents.

One and a half hours? The PAT apple didn’t fall far from that tree.

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