Securing the bicycle train

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byogman
Member
#

I recently picked up a tandem, which by the way is really fun: http://www.amazon.com/Giordano-Viaggio-Tandem-White-Pearl/dp/B004Q3PE30 and am just starting to use it + a trailer for family transportation. Good chance I’ll soon be replacing the double trailer with of these: http://www.amazon.com/Weehoo-iGo-2-Bike-Trailer/dp/B00MSKJU24, to make potholes and occasional sidewalk use less awful (BTW, if anyone has direct experience with this or single vs. double wheel trailers, please share). So, I’m look at a (very low) 4 figure rig, which for a cheapskate like me is borderline unfathomable. And makes me nervous about theft.

So, thoughts? Very, very short stops, I u-lock the tandem and don’t worry about the trailer right now. The weehoo is surprisingly, annoyingly expensive, but not sure if it’s really a theft target since there’d be so few potential buyers?? Am trying not to make very short stops a PITA. Alternatively, if there’s something that can be done with the collar and seat-post attachments similar to security skewers for wheels (which BTW, anyone have experience with?).

Anyways, longer stops, sheltered but outdoor and not quite private storage, I think what I need now is a long, heavy duty chain (tow chain?) and a high grade padlock. Maybe could get away with wire, but then if I wanted to upgrade wheels or something that’s not good enough.

Am I basically thinking about this right or is there another major good option I’m not considering?

Final question, anyone set loop ground anchors or whatever into concrete to make secure outdoor storage for yourself? Let me know.


reddan
Keymaster
#

It’s hard to say for sure, but there appears to be an integral loop at the front of the WeeHoo frame (right ahead of the front crankset) , possibly suitable for passing a chain through? if so, chaining frame of trailer to rear triangle + rear wheel of tandem should work pretty well for securing them for longer stops. Then u-lock the tandem to something, maybe add security skewers to the wheels, and you’ll probably be ok?

For outdoor storage, I have no useful advice to offer. I’d suggest a padlocked shed in preference to a ground anchor, but that is highly dependent on how much space you have.


Marko82
Participant
#

If you go the ground anchor route – you could just as easily put the anchor into a 5 gallon bucket (or probably a little larger) and fill the bucket with concrete. I dont think a bike thief is going to carry a bike and 80 pounds of bucket too far. This is easier than digging a hole and allows you to move the anchor-bucket to different areas of the yard as needed.

You can also use a loop of chain buried in the concrete as the anchor, or a piece of bent re-bar, you dont need to buy a purpose made bike-anchor-system(tm) & the anchor could come out of the side of the bucket not just the top.

edit: another idea is to bury a piece of pvc pipe so that it sticks out of the ground about four feet and fill that with concrete and an side anchor. Making your own hitching post style bike rack. Like this


Vannevar
Participant
#

I read an online post the other day, where a cyclist using a trailer secured the trailer by disabling it, to wit:

remove one wheel from the trailer
lock the removed trailer wheel to the frame with your U-Lock
the trailer just became “less” theft-worthy.

it’s not very secure,
but I thought it was a clever technique.

also there’s this: http://www.bikeforums.net/utility-cycling/648849-how-do-you-lock-your-trailer.html


byogman
Member
#

Will be checking out the weehoo soonish… assuming the igo and igo 2 are the same with regard to attachment points for locking will get some info from that. Honestly, if that is strong and can be locked to the frame without effecting the ability of the system to articulate, the whole thing is so long and unwieldy to do anything but peddle away with (think the bucket of concrete, but long as a car) that just removing the front wheel might be a borderline acceptable theft prevention measure for a quick in and out if there’s no rack, only signs to lock to where I am.

If I don’t like it (and ease of locking is a criterion and I already don’t like the price and the fact that it’s only rated to 100 pounds), maybe it’s time to buckle down and weld my own. Starting without the cranks probably, but then learn from that one to do one with the cranks. My middle girl wants to help.

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