So what are your other interests/hobbies?

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boostuv
Participant
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I guess I’ll play along.

Im a full-time student working at a bank and putting myself through school. I just moved to PGH from Kansas City in August. I love spending time outdoors, whether its hunting, fishing, hiking, snowboarding, cycling, etc… Im excited to get to try out some new things that the terrain here will allow me to do that I couldnt in KS. Things like snowshoeing, rock climbing, long hikes, city to city cycle rides.


Erica
Participant
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went to right by nature to pick up onions and potatoes today, and realized that I love grocery shopping way too much. I get so easily excited about things I haven’t tried yet, and when things I love are on sale ($2.99 for 5 oz of salad greens is amazing). I love the naturally brewed sodas they carry by the cafe (spiced apple cider is delicious), and today I picked up some goat’s milk yogurt, and I don’t think I ever want to eat or drink anything else again.


Pseudacris
Participant
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@RF (or anyone else for that matter) if you want to try culturing your own kefir, I have some extra “grains” to spare. The kind I have is a mother culture that works with all kinds of milk.


ejwme
Participant
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wow – I knew I really liked it here for a reason. Yinz guys are really interesting and fun people :D


Erica
Participant
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Hyla that would be awesome. I don’t have any experience with that, so I may need instructions though. In the meantime, is there anything I should have on hand?


Pseudacris
Participant
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All you need is milk, a clean jar, and something to strain it with. I can give you basic instructions: Put 2T grains in 2C milk in a mason jar with loose lid. Leave on counter 24-36 hrs (stir occasionally), strain, make more…

Everything else you need to know* can be found on this dude’s web site. For me, kefir is not the magic cure-all elixir for all woes. But it is very tasty, fun and easy to culture, and a nice alternative to yogurt and milk. It’s a great base for cold borscht if you like beets. PM me and I’ll get you some grains. Sometimes I have too much on hand, then I just store the grains in the fridge in some milk, which slows them down for a while.

There’s a similar culture that can be used for non-dairy drinks, but I haven’t tried it.

Also, yogurt is super easy to make and I’d be more than happy to show you that as well.


willie p
Participant
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Been riding on the roads since about ’87. If you use Dan Chew-style definition of riding, since ’80 when I got my first BMX.

Kids and Married, mid 30’s now.

Hobbies & Interests (don’t think these are ranked):

Motorcycle riding – mainly 100 to 300 mile day trips

Travel

Foodie & cooking

Antique cars – hot rods and sports cars mostly (restore them, drive them, race when possible)

pick-up games of soccer

Reading about cars and historic racing

Business/sales/entrepreneurial pursuits

Hiking long distance

running

apartment management

Local/regional history exploration

helping people/being helpful

MTB riding

drinking beer and bourbon (not at same time)

Retired Hobbies:

Bike racing (was a cat 2 uscf)

chasing girls

Whitewater and flatwater kayaking

Rock climbing (although may start back up when my kids are old enough to go)

Thanks for taking a look


Erica
Participant
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I like working on stuff for the cafe I plan to open. This makes me sound like such a hippie, but I love it. Reworking my general mission statement

We are a Not-For-Profit cafe with many goals. Our primary goal is School Lunch Reform with help from the Edible Schoolyard program – this will directly benefit all students attending North Ridgeville Public Schools.

Our other goals include education, both for our employees and our guests, on how wonderful and fulfilling simple food, grown close to home by people you know can truly be. We hope to bring a new life to the area, one that is focused on community, and the good people who live here. We encourage our employees and guests to learn what they can from this experience working in the cafe, and then take those skills elsewhere and teach others to enjoy food, to experiment, try new things – We encourage everyone to Share What Ya Got!

“Share What Ya Got!” is the tentative name of my concept (tentative because it’s also an album by Defiance, Ohio, and while I don’t think they’d mind me using it in this way, I’m pretty sure I still need to get permission)


brian j
Participant
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Rock climbing (although may start back up when my kids are old enough to go)

How old are your kids? My older boy took his first trip to the Buttermilks in Bishop, CA when he was about 10 months old.


willie p
Participant
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Rock climbing kids: I know you can take ’em young. But I also don’t want to have to “babysit” them. Note that I did not include one of my hobbies as “parenting”.

not to be crass, I love my kids and love the fact that I am a dad – just sometimes the execution part of parenting makes things like cycling or in this case, rock climbing less enjoyable…and as a result, would rather be without them – that is until they are sufficient to manage themselves to some degree.

that being said; my oldest is 6 years old and I am trying to get him in the rock gym this winter/spring and maybe outdoors this summer.

i hesitated taking him skiing until this summer and he’s doing really well and is going solo (ie – w/out my assistance).

my girls are 2 and 4 and will have the oldest skiing next winter and will likely get her out 1x before the end of this year.

…and back to my curmudgeonly self for a second…I won’t probably consider cycling with my kids until they can ride road bikes unassisted on public roads…so, probably when they are 11 or 12 yrs old at least. (I do throw them in the bike trailer on 20 mile rides, but they oldest two are outgrowing the Chariot trailer).


Lyle
Participant
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Kids love tandems, and they’re a good way to teach by example (but be sure you teach well!)


Shawn
Participant
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I grew up in Brownsville, Pa and currently live in the eastern suburbs.

I’m a Certified Public Accountant that specialized in corporate reporting to the Securities and Exchange Commission – and yes, it’s actually more boring than it sounds. That”s ok though… I’ll be looking for a new job once the merger in which my company is being acquired closes this week!

Most of my time is spent with my wife and 2 year old twin daughters.

Travel is one of the most important things in my life after family. My favorites have been Romania and India.

I’m also a big fan of all types of music. I was one of the few people to major in accounting and minor in music in college.


AtLeastMyKidsLoveMe
Participant
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“sometimes the execution part of parenting makes things like cycling or in this case, rock climbing less enjoyable…”

Vikings were known to eat their young also, were they not?

(Sorry, couldn’t resist)


willie p
Participant
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oh…I got it now….that’s funny! Must confess the first time I read it (earlier) today…I didn’t get it. :-)


Nick D
Participant
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Willie, what kind of motorcycle?

I’ve been keeping an eye out for a 70’s Honda CB, but there doesn’t seem to be a lot in the area.


RickyTickyTac
Participant
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Full time student, former engineering major, current physics major. 5th year with no end in sight.

I’m a mediocre musician and play bass in a silly band mostly in people’s basements, though sometimes we’ve been known to play a real show.

On the subject of being a musician, I used to like building electric guitars and basses but I haven’t built one for about a year.

I’m a habitual tinkerer, and everything I own does not stay in its original form for long. From swapping out parts on my bikes, to upgrading components of my musical equipment, to modifying electrical gadgets, to installing PA systems and musical horns in cars, I do all kinds of crazy stuff. Sometimes, I ruin things.

I have a huge collection of vinyl albums, about 400 or so, that I will never have the time to listen to all of. It started in high school when I inherited my uncle’s old albums, and soon I was addicted. I haven’t bought any for a few years because I have way too many.

I watch campy old sci fi movies. All the time.

Brewing beer is a lot of fun for me. My latest batches have been a berry wheat beer, a brown ale, and a Belgian white. Some of my crazy friends dubbed me the “Big Dick Brewing Co.” because my name is Richard, and they were all drunk on my beer.

I have a pet bunny. She likes to poop all over my laundry.

I really love unexpected, outrageous things and try to surround myself by them. I gravitate toward very spontaneous, loud, mostly crazy people and love it when something ridiculous happens that I will have a great story to tell about.

This might not qualify as an OTHER interest, but I’m really into wheel building. I don’t know why, I just find it to be really relaxing.

I’m also addicted to spending money on things that I really shouldn’t.


willie p
Participant
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@nickyD: “Willie, what kind of motorcycle?

I’ve been keeping an eye out for a 70’s Honda CB, but there doesn’t seem to be a lot in the area.”

I have a Buell XB12sTT – a newer/modern take on the old “standards”. has a v-twin however!

I do like older stuff – Beemers and Triumphs as well as Indians and Harleys from the 30’s to 50’s.

There are plenty of CB’s around. Craigslist and Jaxed.com are your friends for that kind of stuff.

as an aside – I’ve found that bicycling and motorcycling are sooo complementary in terms of handling skills, vertical/gyroscopic awareness and even safety….as cycling is WAY WAY WAY more dangerous than motorcycling. …since a bicyclist is very vulnerable to other motorists and cannot effectively defensively drive (ie – “speed away” from dangerous situations). i do also acknowledge the dangers of motorcyling. buy my personal opinion is that bicycling is more dangerous and I’ve been cycling since the 80’s and only really seriously involved with motorbikes for 3 years now.

FYI – my avatar of Eddy Merckx motorpacing combines several of my interests (to help keep this post back on thread)…motorcycles, vintage sports/competition, cycling)


Mick
Participant
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A Willie Pas cycling is WAY WAY WAY more dangerous than motorcycling. …since a bicyclist is very vulnerable to other motorists and cannot effectively defensively drive

This is totally wrong.

What I’m about to say here is very harsh, but it has to be said.

Motorcycle far more dangerous than cycling. This isn’t just some opinion of mine, the stats are very clear.

Any estimate you see of fatality shows motorcycling more dangerous than bicycling.

Here’s a couple of scientific references.

See table 1:

http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/accidents/casualtiesgbar/suppletablesfactsheets/pedalcyclist2008.pdf

Kilometer by kilometer motorcycles have 97 fatalites for 1,000,000 km. Bicycles have 32. That “3x” estimate is the most conservative estimate I’ve ever seen for the relative risks of bikes and motorcycles. It’s WAY conservative.

This is a table that’s quoted a lot

http://www.mikeash.com/fatalities_per_million_hours.txt

This is from Design News, 10 April 1993, in a study done by Failure Analysis Associates, Inc,

It says that for a million hours of participation, there are on average .26 biycling deaths – and 8.8 motorcycling deaths. It puts motorcying at 33 time as dangerous. This is in keeping with my recollection of other motorcyle/bicycle safety comparisons.

Both of those are way differnt – they can’t both be right, of course. I’d estimate somewhere between those is the truth

Wille P, your logic here is specious. The capacity of a motorcyle is not defensive at all, but rather the capacity to put yourself in more trouble at higher speed.

You might want to stay away from motorcycles – because your intuition and logic about the risks involved is so inaccurate.


ejwme
Participant
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ouch Mick… maybe Willie could learn some more, since 3 years is relatively new, and enhance his understanding of the risks and what causes them, rather than abandon a new hobby he quite clearly loves. Just riding a motorcycle isn’t what kills people – it’s how they ride, where, conditions, skill sets, understanding and whatnot. All of which it seems to me could improve with study, discussion, and practice. Something an avid enthusiast is likely to do anyway.

You gotta do what you love. Life without passion is like food without flavor – choking and depressing.


StuInMcCandless
Participant
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I’ve been on bicycles since 6 (geez, even at 4 I was riding a tricycle solo along the sides of some sidewalk-less Buffalo streets) and motorcycles since 8. Hundreds of in-woods hours on m/c, thousands of on-roads hours on bicycle.

I’ve gotten hurt on both, in nearly all cases doing something stupid, or someone else doing something stupid. Education, and not being an asshat, will keep you safe on both.

All that said, I’m more with Mick. It’s much easier to get in over your head on m/c, and also the magnitude of injury from speed.


myddrin
Participant
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@mick — do you know the source for the tabulation of fatalities per million hours?

I’d like to get a biz card of that printed up for when people say “You bike to work, isn’t that dangerous?” But without attribution, it looses it’s umph….


Greasefoot
Participant
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I don’t want to get into the motorcycling debate but I ride both and for me I feel safer on my motorcycle then a bicycle. Leather jacket, boots, full-face helmet vs. light nylon clothing and styrofoam half helmet. Inherently there are risks in both activities. The chance of a fatality is obviously greater at high speeds on a motorcycle.

Something I would like to share that I think is very important. When I took the motorcycle safety class many moons ago the instructor said something that stuck in my head to this day. He stated that more then 80% of motorcycle accidents occur at intersections and he really emphasized keeping your head on a swivel when approaching one. He said something to the effect that you can’t predict the future or pick the lottery numbers but odds are that if you are going to be in a motorcycle accident it’s most likely going to be at an intersection.

This may not be statistically correct for bicycle riding. But I apply his theory when I ride my bicycle and keep my head on a swivel approaching and ridding thru any intersection.


Mick
Participant
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@myydrin

As I said This is from Design News, 10 April 1993, in a study done by Failure Analysis Associates, Inc,

That is all I know about it. It is more-or-less consistent with other stats I’ve seen, or I would not have posted it.

Oddly enough, virtually all the tables I’ve seen about the relative hazards of activities were from bicycle sources.

People somehow don’t feel the need to defend the safey of car use, even though it kills a hundred or so a day in the US.


Mick
Participant
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@willie P – I apologize for making personal suggestions about what you do. It really isn’t my business.

People are allowed- and should be allowed-do do things that have some danger involved.


AtLeastMyKidsLoveMe
Participant
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Ahh… I love the sound of civil discourse in the morning. It sounds like… democracy!


myddrin
Participant
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@mick — thanks, somehow I missed that. I did a google search and came up with a couple other links.

Hopefully, I can find a little info about their methodology…. AND a printing company that will let me print up a small batch of these. For what ever reason, I seem to get asked this often.


willie p
Participant
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uhhhhhhh…. not sure where all that was directed, but I feel bad now that we were/are hijacking a previously innocuous thread.

As far as my analysis was concerned, I was just giving a subjective, seat of the pants dangerous-quotient. I find it much better to stirring debate. No fun when everyone is in consensus!

I’d be open to a new thread if ppl wanted to do so.

I just like being on two wheels – both bicycles and motorcycles provide an amazing amount of adventure and freedom to take roads less traveled, if at all.

wp


brian j
Participant
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uhhhhhhh…. not sure where all that was directed, but I feel bad now that we were/are hijacking a previously innocuous thread.

You clearly haven’t been ’round these parts for long–this is a time-honored tradition!


AtLeastMyKidsLoveMe
Participant
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“You clearly haven’t been ’round these parts for long–this is a time-honored tradition!”

+1 – and no offense williep, but far more colorful characters and causes have thread-jacked: Vikings, vegans, ninjas, u-lock wielding, Chuck Norris and The Rules to name a few.

Welcome.


reddan
Keymaster
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Vikings, vegans, ninjas, u-lock wielding, Chuck Norris and The Rules to name a few.

I’ll buy a beer for the first person to find a past thread that includes all of the above.


dooftram
Participant
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Well, the motorcycling/bicycling talk brought me out (more sporadic lurker than regular poster here). I accept the various risks of both types of riding. In the end, you can’t beat death, but you can beat death in your life. I appreciate thoughtful consideration of ways to enhance the relative safety of a given activity, but risk aversion can become a disease like any other. Take precautions and go.

I ride an old German motorcycle (BMW R65), not quite as old as the one piloted by the lovely lady in my avatar, but simple enough to work on it myself and new enough that it actually stops. I love wrenching on the moto and my assortment of bicycles. That and the slow, uphill slog of renovating an old row house in Larryland keeps me out of trouble, mostly. Like a lot of you, I’d like to start growing more of my own food and maybe even build a little greenhouse. Just tomatoes and peppers, some greens and the usual herbs so far. Probably should get myself a kayak or canoe soon, too. I live two blocks from the river. It’s about time I paddle on it. I teach writing, lit, etc. for a living, so that’s where work and hobbies/interests bleed together.

Nick, Honda CBs are great. I’ve had both a 350 and a 400T. Stick w/ 350 and stay away from the 360 and later 400/450 twins. They have various problems (cam chain tensioner, etc) that make them short-lived. The only thing that got better were the brakes.


Lyle
Participant
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The capacity of a motorcycle is not defensive at all, but rather the capacity to put yourself in more trouble at higher speed.

That. Also, just like bicycling, motorcycling gets safer with experience. The classic motorcycle fatality is somebody jumps on a borrowed bike and tries to run through all the gears and discovers that once you hit sixth gear you run out of road awfully fast.

Also, trying to stop from 100mph is a good deal trickier on a motorcycle than in a car.

I feel safer on my motorcycle

People’s intuitions about what “feels” safer are so frequently in error that this kind of a sentence deserves its own Latin name. Just saying.

more then 80% of motorcycle accidents occur at intersections

And… this. It applies equally well to bicycle accidents.


edmonds59
Participant
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I have crashed a number of times on motorcycles. I have crashed innumerable times on bicycles. So it is statistically impossible to make a comparison between numerable and innumerable based on my experience. Oddly, I think I am in better shape and creak less than most of my 50 year old friends. Sometimes I feel like Wolverine. I think it’s all been worth it.


willie p
Participant
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hey edmonds, I still wanna see a larger pic of your avatar? (i sent you a PM).

If I could figure how to post here (pic), i’ll put a pic of my Waterford up.

more thread hijacking – wow, I could get used to this!

wp


dwillen
Participant
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You can view any avatar image in a new window/tab, then replace the s=80 with something larger to get a big picture.


ejwme
Participant
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“it” ate my post AGAIN. (third time’s the charm?)

reddan – you owe ALMKLM a beer then, because he mentioned them all in this thread. Or me for pointing it out, but I think ALMKLM would appreciate it more ;)

I think most car accidents happen at intersections as well. this means it’s clearly the intersections’ faults, and they should be eliminated. All roads should be parallel, or cul-de-sacs only. I think I’ve gone too silly to continue.

Back to the topic at hand, my woodworking class at this place just started yesterday: http://www.dilegnosupply.com/Classes/woodworking_classes.htm and it is the awesomest class on the planet. Instructor clearly loves woodworking AND teaching, so it’s easy and fun to learn from him. My favorite part so far is the saw he reccommends is Japanese, so when I was working I kept hearing Japanese game show sound effects in my head. And flattening chisel backs is very soothing.

Ok, back to pirate viking ninja zombies, or whatever.


edmonds59
Participant
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Woo! That was easy. Thanks.


Eric Lundgren
Participant
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This is a neat thread

I grew up north of the Allegheny National Forest moved to Pittsburgh 8 years ago mainly to play ice hockey and secondly to go to school.

I unfortunately don’t play that much hockey any more due to multiple shoulder surgies and the fact that I’ll never play checking hockey again. Luckily the fact that I had to take time off from hockey brought me to cycling more specifically racing bikes.

I race road and cyclocross.

I too still listen to ska but mostly of the variety cburch described.

I did graduate school and got a drafting degree and that’s what I do now for work. I’ve drafted/ designed lots of different things such as detailed rebar models, mining machinery, parts of glass plants, parts of steel mills, and even a little piping. Its proved to be a pretty dependable occupation.

Its interesting how many people on here are/ were involved in engineering.


myddrin
Participant
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Its interesting how many people on here are/ were involved in engineering.

I’ve noticed that too. I wonder if that is something about cycling or something about Pittsburgh? There are some pretty decent Engineering/Science schools round here.

I know I came here originally for school, although not for engineering.


Morningsider
Participant
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Geesh! I’m pretty much forced to chime in now. Not so much because I’m an engineer (WVU not Pitt) but because one of the coolest things I ever learned about woodworking was that a Japanese saw’s teeth cut on the pull-stroke not the push-stroke because the Japanese believe in bringing the wood into the body.

@ejwme – hopefully your instructor already told you that.

I think it would suffice to say hobbies are my hobby. I’ve always said that I am good at everything and great at nothing. That was, until I became a dad.

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