Thur. May 26: Proposed Negley Ave Bike Lane Public Meeting

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erok
Keymaster
#


The proposed Negley Ave bike lanes will provide an
important network connection. Your input throughout project
development is very important to its success! The project team will be available at the meeting to answer questions and gather feedback.

Questions? Please contact Kristin Saunders, Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator, City of Pittsburgh.
E-mail: kristin.saunders@pittsburghpa.gov
Phone: 412-393-0150

facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/828830750555353/

  • This topic was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by  erok.

erok
Keymaster
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there will be some call out for things to do in regards to this, but in the meantime, please feel free to email Kristin at the above email address about it, and/or have a story to share, near miss or hit, etc.

She’ll be compiling the emails she receives about it


Gordon
Participant
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Here’s my email to Kristin:

“I’d like speak in favor of the Negley Ave Bike Lane plan. I ride my bike through the planned route almost everyday, and I’ve witnessed many drivers using the right lane to to get ahead of the traffic on the left lane, and often at speed above posted limits, putting us bike commuters in danger. I was wondering if it’s possible to set up similar lane system as that on E Liberty Blvd. It would be tremendously helpful in ensuring safety of all road users. Thank you very much!”


erok
Keymaster
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great thanks!


Eric
Member
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I emailed too, same basic message as Gordon. I also stressed that it is wide enough and the traffic light enough during most parts of the day that the extra traffic lanes aren’t needed, and will turn it from a 4 lane highway into a 2 lane street. Feedback from her was positive.


Jason-PGH
Member
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My email in support:

Good Morning,

My name is Jason Ferrante and I am a resident of the East Liberty neighborhood. I frequently commute on Negley Avenue between my house and Oakland. I am writing in support of the Negley Avenue bike lanes. I feel that, in it’s current state, the road is too wide and too many lanes for the amount of traffic that uses it, and these bike lanes would help with the problem.

However, I have three main concerns that I would like to bring up (I will be unable to attend the meeting.)

1. Buffered bike lanes – I am not sure about the official plans, but this road seems feasibly wide enough for buffered bike lanes. Given the high volume of traffic, as well as the high speed at which this traffic travels, buffered bike lanes should be prioritized, as opposed to regular bike lanes. If regular bike lanes are used, many may feel safer simply taking the lane as opposed to riding in the bike lane. Buffered bike lanes would also make me (personally) feel safer when the high volume of bus traffic that drive on Negley (71A, 71C, 87, 77, etc.)

2. Tricky intersections – One of the more difficult intersections where the bike lane would pass through is the one with Negley Avenue, Roup, and Centre Avenue. Bikes, hypothetically in a right hand bike lane, would have to be seen behind a building (Hertz Rent-A-Car) then proceed to cut in front of traffic to get into the straight only lane, creating a dangerous mixing zone. I’m not sure how to solve this, but it should take some consideration. Could green painted bike lanes be taken into consideration?

3. Right hooks and swerving – A lot of vehicles, including buses, make right hand turns off of Negley Avenue onto side roads (Penn Avenue and Friendship Avenue come to mind.) If the bike lane is on the right hand side, many cars would be hooking bikes in the bike lane. Potentially, at this location, there should be a designated right hand turning lane and the bike lane continues to the left of the right hand turning lane. Likewise, the right turn only lane at Penn and Negley should also be looked at. Furthermore, many vehicles turn left off of Negley Avenue (E. Liberty Blvd.) As there is no designated left turn only lane here, many cars will subsequently swerve around these vehicles, and without a designated lane to turn left, to go straight, and a bike lane, cars may end up swerving into the bike lane, potentially creating a conflict with bikes.

Again, thank you so much for all you do and these bike lanes are a big step forward in terms of bringing essential bike infrastructure to Pittsburgh’s East End.

Best,

Jason


Eric
Member
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that centre/roup/negley intersection is extra special. It’ll be interesting to see how they shoehorn the bike lanes in there.

the only way I’ve ever found to be safe on that block (you know, because of traffic all over the place, and buses, etc. etc) is to take the lane going either direction on Negley. And when I’m heading toward Shadyside, I point like crazy, even if I’m going straight, especially as it curves around that Hertz car rental place.


adams
Member
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Maybe building out the curbs on Roup would help.


tenplusone
Member
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My email in support, busy at work, so I had to whip it up fairly quickly.

Good morning Kristin,

I hope this correspondence finds you well.
I will be unable to attend the public meeting for the proposed bike lane project on Negley Ave.

I wanted to show my support for the project through email.
This project, if done properly (protected bike lane, two way with bollards), would contribute greatly to the bike infrastructure of the city.

As it is currently, Negley Ave presents as one of the difficult main arteries in the east end to navigate on bike, primarily due to aggressive and exceedingly fast motor vehicle traffic.

The posted limit is 25mph, and 15mph in the school zone areas of the street. It is common to see vehicles traveling at 40-50 mph easy on this road. I suspect it is due to the condition of the street surface (overall, quite good), and the high visibility proceeding down Negley.

In my experiences, vehicles traveling at 25mph is an anomaly. I have been passed extremely recklessly while riding on this road. Legally holding the lane while riding a bicycle is also dangerous due to the aggressive motorist behavior on this street. (this serves as the current safest way to traverse this road by bike).

If done properly, the bike lanes could help encourage better motor vehicle operator behavior and hopefully encourage these same drivers to take up riding to their destinations in the city.

If relevant, the number one reason I have observed as to why people don’t want to ride the city streets is the fear of erratic and careless motorists.

These lanes help cyclists get noticed while riding legally and contribute to the overall goal of safer city streets.

Negley ave is not the highway that motorists treat it as. It is a residential street traversing several neighborhoods, schools, churches, businesses, and homes.

Please consider taking this opportunity to embrace this and consider some bike lanes so that these neighborhoods feel more connected, more like home.

Thank you for your time.


Gordon
Participant
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I’ve biked through this corridor almost everyday, and I like the bike lane plan. It’s very intuitive to me since I usually ride like the planned bike lane’s directions. It will help new bike commuters learn the safe way to negotiate through urban traffic, and hopefully bring more people to choose bicycling as their primary mode of transportation.

Below are some pictures of the plan, but the city will also put the plan on their website soon.




erok
Keymaster
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i think just adding clarity and turning lanes to the corridor will make it better for driving cars on as well. albeit a bit slower (read: speed limit)


chrishent
Member
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The presentation for this meeting can be found here:

http://apps.pittsburghpa.gov/dcp/Negley_PublicMeeting_20160526.pdf


buffalo buffalo
Participant
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> This project, if done properly (protected bike lane, two way with bollards)

To be clear, this won’t be happening—it’ll be one lane on each side, paint only. A section will have buffers between the bike and general-traffic lanes, but due to driveways and such very little of even the buffered section will have bollards.

The lanes will, however, be larger than we’re used to in many parts of the city—a full six feet in sections, five in most of the project.


quizbot
Participant
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Any updates on the Negley Ave project? I emailed Kristin earlier this week but have not received a response yet.


erok
Keymaster
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I’m told this will be in by the end of summer.


quizbot
Participant
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That’s awesome… thanks Erok!


erok
Keymaster
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ok just got word that it’s supposed to be done by Sept 30. Fingers crossed


erok
Keymaster
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erok
Keymaster
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the thread on Nextdoor about this is surprisingly positive.


Benzo
Participant
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Wow, Nextdoor. Quite civil and positive.

Accountability requiring you to use your real name, no suburbanites who only pass through commenting since it’s locals only, and a lack of trolls that scour the post gazette probably doesn’t hurt.


Eric
Member
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I think, too, is that a lot of E liberty residents rely on walking and the 71A and are sick of trying to cross the street with traffic going a little too fast for comfort. Plus mix in some less car-centric gentrifiers.


the beast
Participant
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I work at the corner of Negley and Friendship, they started marking out what appears to be the bike lanes today!


Benzo
Participant
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Saw markers for lanes and other stuff roughed out on Negley Ave today when driving through highland park. I’m a bit bummed, as it appears that they are going to recreate the dangerous situation I encounter regularly at Bayard and Bigelow intersection in Oakland. I’ve had many close calls due to auto traffic driving in to the bike lane during the transition.

The issue is a large buffer space in the middle of the road followed by a quick transition of the bike lane around street parking on the right.  Appears to be going in at Negley and Black Street intersection with the exact same dangerous design.

One big thing which I think could make both designs better would be to narrow the yellow buffer in the center of the roadway so to funnel auto traffic slightly less towards the bike lane transition.

Here’s a google maps linke showing what this situation looks like at bayard and bigelow. https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4476706,-79.9536725,3a,75y,53.04h,62.23t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sbN5BCQuViYHdEbL8UeTYiw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

See example video of rush hour on this stretch, where 85% of auto traffic fails to not drive on or in the bike lane: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMAuOO99sgI

I really don’t want this same situation recreated on Negley.

  • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Benzo.

zzwergel
Member
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@benzo,

Would Installing bollards around the buffer zone and a guard rail/bollards across from the intersecting street be of any use in these two scenarios?

  • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  zzwergel.

Eric
Member
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I saw that too. They have the bike lane turning at sharp angles meaning cars will drive in it. And bollards won’t work because the bike lane bumps out for car parking. The bollards will require cars to stop and back in, backing up and stopping the cars since negley will be one lane each way. And this will mean more cars stopped in the bike lane waiting.

 

Also, I bet that the bollards will be knocked down repeatedly


zzwergel
Member
#

Negley Ave. used to terminate at Baum Blvd. The section of Negley Between Baum Blvd. and Roup Ave. did not exist. Only Roup Ave. continued south of Baum Blvd. and into Shadyside.


Ahlir
Participant
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This may be a bit OT, but I saw a really nice solution to (some of) these issues in Montreal.

The following arrangement makes things much better for cyclists but (among other things) managing the risk of right-hooks, while separating bike (and bus) traffic from car traffic.

Note how the transition to the curb lane includes a no-parking stretch and a sizable buffer, addresses some of the problems we have at Bayard/Bigelow.

Additionally, the signalization includes a bicycle phase that further improves safety.

St. Urbain is a 1-way street, so maybe there was room for what they did. But I think that streets like Negley have the width for something similar that clearly separates traffic without committing to a full bike-lane solution.


zzwergel
Member
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I have a proposal.

Make Roup Ave. between Dapper Way and Negley Ave. bike/pedestrian only.


Eric
Member
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Dapper way doesn’t actually connect to roup. Also, there is no way for a car to make a right from Baum heading eastbound onto negley heading south bound.  That’s what roup is used for.

I’m not sure what your proposal would accomplish anyway.


zzwergel
Member
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@Ed,

I do not see any No Right Turn sign on Baum Blvd. eastbound at Negley Ave. on Google maps.

Making Roup Ave. one-way toward Negley Ave. might work. Also, couldn’t eastbound traffic on Baum use Graham St. to Centre Ave. and right onto Negley Ave. from Centre Ave.? Westbound Centre Ave. should also have a protected left onto Southbound Negley Ave.

  • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by  zzwergel.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by  zzwergel.

quizbot
Participant
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In general I’m stupid happy about Negley lanes going in and treatment. This makes my commute about 90% complete with lanes / sharrows / trail to downtown.

I do have questions about the Negley outbound / Black St angular transition. Why not a smoothed out curve? If the concern is loss of a parking space between Black and Hays, it’s totally unfounded as there are rarely more than a few cars parked on either side of Negley in that block at any given time of day.

Is the angle transition a design standard of some sort? If so why? People don’t drive at sharp angles, even at low speed. It makes zero practical sense.

A smooth elongated curve would make all parties happier.

That is my humble opinion. ;)


Eric
Member
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They did the same thing in Oakland. My guess is they just don’t think and do it angled.


quizbot
Participant
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Someone has thought about the rest of the placement… I don’t think they’re just throwing it out there to see if it sticks.

I could be wrong.

There must be some sort of design/ engineering standard they’re following, but again it makes zero practical sense for real life traffic flow.

Smooth curves in the transition is not rocket science.

To be fair it’s a pinch point in outbound flow with the left turning lane onto Black, but the angle is definitely janky.

Actual use case won’t often matter but it’d at least be more aesthetically pleasing with a curve.


zzwergel
Member
#

@quizbot,

I thing the intersecton of Highland Ave./Walnut St. is a lot worse. Also, the series of curves on 5th Ave. between Robinson St. and Kirkpatrick St. makes the ride form Oakland to Uptown somewhat enjoyable.


erok
Keymaster
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welp, the city just sent out this presser

 

PITTSBURGH, PA (September 22, 2017) – The City of Pittsburgh Departments of Mobility and Infrastructure and Public Works advise that the installation of bike lanes on Negley Avenue – from Howe Street to Stanton Avenue spanning the neighborhoods of Shadyside, Friendship, Garfield and East Liberty – is scheduled to begin on Monday, September 25, 2017.

The Negley project design will include bike lane and shared lane markings along designated portions of Negley Avenue. Shared lane markings begin at the intersection of Howe Street and Negley Avenue and extend to Centre Avenue. Bike lane markings extend from Centre Avenue to Stanton Avenue. A map with example photos of the of the project infrastructure can be found here.

Residents and businesses along the project route have been notified in advance of the project through public meetings, informational flyers, community newsletters, social media posts, bike advocacy groups and posters in grocery stores and gathering spaces.

Construction of the Negley bike lane project is weather dependent and is currently scheduled to last through the months of September and October and to conclude by November 1, 2017. Some preparatory work may begin in advance of Monday. Major pavement marking improvements are anticipated to occur Monday, September 25, through Friday, September 29. Residents should obey all posted parking variances. During installation, motorists should expect delays and intermittent lane restrictions. No detours are required.

Construction costs for the Negley Avenue bike lane project are approximately $387,870. The project is fully funded by the Federal Highway Administration’s Transportation Alternatives Program.

###


zzwergel
Member
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On my way home from Oakland yesterday, I saw where the lanes are to be located. Many motorists were encroaching on the draft areas especially between Friendship Ave. and Rural St.


Ahlir
Participant
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A map with example photos of the of the project infrastructure can be found here.

Can you post the link? The PR text doesn’t resolve to a webpage…


Steven
Participant
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The City’s press release on its website links to this map (click for bigger):


Benzo
Participant
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FWIW, last week I forwarded my concerns along about the transition around parking (pretty much verbatim of what I posted here) to the bike-ped coordinator, who told me the comments were forwarded to the design team.

Not sure if that will change things since the ball is already rolling, but hey, I put it out there.


Ahlir
Participant
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Went through there today, by car and by bike. A couple of observations.

  • Northbound on Negley (by car), the left onto Roup is really confusing. At the very least it would help to have a broken yellow line guiding you into the correct lane. Also, southbound drivers were ignoring the whole bike lane thing. I hope they lay down the green carpet, otherwise it’s just not going to work.

  • Southbound on Negley (by bike), the bike lane is cool. Straight-through traffic on your left, right turns on your right. Except when I was there, the cars on both sides headed down Negley. This will be exciting fun for bikers.
    Anyone coming down Roup will likely find it difficult to veer over to the left side of the lane when there’s traffic. I can see the incentive to drive on top of the bike lane.

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