Using the trolley with your bike

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Anonymous #

I am a bicycle commuter from along the trolley line in the South Hills. I am wondering if anyone has advice for using the trolley for part of the trip into town and the North Side? Specifically, cost of using the trolley, etiquette when boarding with a bicycle, best times to avoid crowded conditions, and any other relevant advice. Thanks.


Anonymous #

http://www.portauthority.org/paac/RiderServices/Riding101.aspx

http://www.portauthority.org/paac/RiderServices/BikesonTransit.aspx

I’ve used it to to ride from South Hills Village Garage (or Washington Junction) to 2nd and back. To avoid crowd stay either real early (I’ve started at 5:30am-6:10am) or a little bit pass 9:00am. On way back I’ve used any T around 7:00 pm (Blue or Red, short or long) — for me there is a little difference in terms of arrival time to home.


Anonymous #

The preferred seat to use are the sideways benches, this train was mostly empty, so I didn’t fold them up.

Photobucket


StuInMcCandless
Participant
#

To save you some digging and clicking on the Port Authority links above, here is the relevant info:

Bikes on the T

Bikes are allowed on the Port Authority’s light rail system – commonly known as the T – at all times in either direction. Riders may load/unload their non-folding bikes at high-platform stations only. View a light rail system map that identifies high-platform stations.

Two bikes are permitted per light rail vehicle and must be stowed in the designated wheelchair spaces. Persons in wheelchairs have priority over bicycles.

Be sure to hold onto your bike securely while on the T and keep it clear of aisles and doorways. Bicycles must be walked at all times when accessing Port Authority T stations.


Anonymous #

Thanks for all the good information!


Anonymous #

Rode to Washington Junction, took the “T” from there to North Side (Allegheny stop) and rode the bike from there to work. It was relaxing change from driving my vehicle and fighting traffic to work. I was able to board the “T” with my bike, much like the photo above. Bicycling seems to be so much accepted that most of the other passengers scarcely took note of me and my bike.


edmonds59
Participant
#

@”Bicycling seems to be so much accepted that most of the other passengers scarcely took note of me and my bike.”

By taking that trip you have done more than making things a little easier for yourself. Any number of people observed your actions, consciously or not, and it registered in their minds as even a little more normal and acceptable. You have officially become part of changing the world. Nice work!

You will eventually encounter the occasional tiny brained jerk or dinosaur. Forget ’em.

That you would start this in December is even more commendable, props.

This has been posted before, but too good not to put up:

http://www.ted.com/talks/derek_sivers_how_to_start_a_movement.html


Chris Mayhew
Participant
#

FWIW my usual MO is to sit in the stair well and lean my bike against the fare machine. It’s surprisingly stable as long as you keep a light touch on the wheel for stops. It means I’m out of the way and so is the bike.

Big thanks to Bike PGH. I was able to take my bike on during rush hour yesterday. That was really nice.


Anonymous #

The Ted Talk was pretty good. Thanks for sharing it. Regarding using the stairwell, I’ll have to take a closer look next time. Also, concerning rush hour, I went in very early, so high passenger volume was not a big factor. In the afternoon, I rode over to South Side, met a friend for dinner, and got a ride home for me and my bike. Next week, I’ll give the “T” a try in the afternoon. All that can happen is that I’ll have to ride up over the hill to get home if I am not allowed on the T. I’ll let you know how it goes.


Steven
Participant
#

When I ride the T and it’s not crowded, I try to sit in the first or second of the single seats opposite the fold-up wheelchair area, usually at the back of the car. Then I pull my bike in tight right next to me, so it’s only blocking those first two seats, and loop an arm around the seat post. That leaves me with both hands free and the bike secure, while only occupying two seats.


Anonymous #

@fultonco my recollection of using T for whole summer of 2010 while I was working at PNC on 2700 Liberty is that around 16:30 and up to 18:00 is pretty full (I started at 7:00 and was done by 16:00 and then busing/walking to downtown). Sometimes it was hard even move through crown on way to door. And South Hills Village Garage had always at least 40 riders walking out.


Anonymous #

Thanks again for the good information. On Monday, it was raining as I left work. Thinking that it might not be very considerate to get on a crowded train in my soaking wet condition, I took a chance on the Incline. Thankfully, I was the only passenger. From the top of Mount Washington, I rode home to Bethel Park without incident. Needless to say, I was quite wet by the time I arrived but really didn’t mind at all. After hot shower for me, a good wash and lube for the bike, we both looked and felt better.


Anonymous #

saw this today, for those who want/need transit information (copied from Macworld)

HopStop

http://hopstop.com/

When Apple switched from Google Maps in iOS 6, it not only cost some Apple execs their jobs, but also deprived us of public transportation maps. Fortunately, HopStop stepped in to fill that void, offering directions on getting places by subway, bus, train, and foot for more than 100 cities in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Besides directions, the app offers transit-system maps for several cities, service advisories (in New York), and biking directions (in New York, Washington D.C., Chicago, and San Francisco); it can even estimate taxi fares. As a replacement for iOS 5’s Maps app, HopStop offers many of the same features, including transit schedules and the ability to calculate trip times at particular hours of the day. It also lets you find subway stations and bus stops near any location, and allows you to bookmark certain frequently used routes. Advanced search features even let you specify which types of transit to use or not use.—Dan Moren

4.5 out of 5 rating; free; HopStop.com


Anonymous #

Hop Stop has helped me learn the basic bus routes and stops I need, to get around town or back home. I dig it.


Benzo
Participant
#

I just use the google maps app (it’s available on iphone/iOS now and has transit directions). Alternatively, you can use the google maps mobile website as well.


Anonymous #

It would be nice if the “T” had a map of their routes inside the vehicle. If they do, it is not easily seen from every vantage point. I have seen this in other cities and it helps to gauge where you are going, if not yet completely familiar with the system. However, this is the kind of “town” where you do have to have a good working knowledge of how to get around. This comes with repetition, of course.


StuInMcCandless
Participant
#

^wot ‘e said

(…that I’ve been repeating so long and so often that I’m tired of hearing myself say it)

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